Tuesday, June 19, 2018
Opinion

Column: Trumpism for thee, but not for me

There are a lot of problems with living near an offshore oil rig. The smell can be nasty. The rigs produce something known as tarballs ó little globs of petroleum that wash up on land. Even modest oil spills, which happen pretty frequently, can disrupt life. A major spill can devastate a community.

No wonder, then, that people living along both the East and West coasts objected when the Trump administration announced a big expansion of drilling last month. But only one area has managed to win a promised exemption to the drilling: Florida.

Why? Well, Floridaís governor is Rick Scott, a Republican whom President Donald Trump is trying to persuade to run for the Senate this year. If Scott does run, he doesnít want to be forced to defend an unpopular new drilling plan.

So Trumpís larger agenda will move ahead, with a special exception to that very same agenda for the presidentís closest allies. Itís Trumpism-for-thee-but-not-for-me, and it is becoming a pattern.

Hereís how it works: First, the Trump administration, often with congressional Republicans, enacts a policy that harms a large number of Americans. Then local or state allies of the administration raise objections. Ultimately, the administration and Congress create a carve-out that protects a small number of favored constituents while leaving most of the damaging policy in place.

It is splendidly hypocritical, of course: If Trumpís agenda is as wonderful as he says, his loyal supporters should surely get to benefit from it as well. But I think it also contains an important lesson for anyone trying to stop Trumpís agenda: Keep calling attention to the substance of that agenda, because it is deeply unpopular ó and even Trumpís allies know itís unpopular.

The pattern first appeared during the attempts to repeal Obamacare last year. The repeal bills would have sharply cut federal spending on health insurance. Yet not every part of the country would have experienced a cut. Most blue states would have suffered large reductions (Trumpism for thee ...), while many red states would actually have received more federal subsidies (... but not for me).

Then came the tax law passed in December. Not only does it shift billions of federal dollars from blue states to red, it does so partly through duplicity.

The clearest example is a new tax on colleges with an endowment of at least $500,000 per full-time student. It was aimed at bastions of liberalism, like Harvard University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Stanford University and Amherst College. But members of Congress eventually realized that the endowment tax would also apply to Berea College, a small institution in Kentucky with a nice-sized endowment.

Kentucky, as you are probably aware, is the home state of Mitch McConnell, the Senate majority leader. So McConnell "insisted" (his word) that last weekís budget deal create a carve-out to spare Berea from the tax.

I want to emphasize that Berea is an extremely impressive place. It enrolls only lower-income students, most of them from Appalachia, and doesnít charge tuition. But the idea that congressional Republicans are just trying to protect low-income students ó their rationalization for the carve-out ó is ridiculous.

For one thing, those same members of Congress have repeatedly taken steps to make college more expensive for both low- and middle-income families. So have state-level Republicans, which helps explain why nationwide per-student funding for higher education has dropped 16 percent since 2008. Trump and House leaders recently proposed further cuts.

For another thing, Berea, admirable as it is, happens to be tiny. It graduated about 315 lower-income students last year. By comparison, New York University graduated more than 1,000 lower-income students. Arizona State University ó located in the state suffering from the deepest college funding cuts ó graduated 7,500 such students. McConnell hasnít done any "insisting" on their behalf.

All of this hypocrisy is certainly maddening. But as the old saying goes: Donít get mad, get even. The Trumpism-for-thee phenomenon helps point the way to fighting back against Trumpism.

Donít focus mostly on the outrages, the insults and the scandals. Most voters have become inured to them. Focus instead on the demagogueís policies and job performance.

Most Americans donít want college to become more expensive. They donít want medical care to become less accessible. They donít want to live among tarballs or breathe dirtier air. They donít want the top priorities of the federal government to be maximizing corporate profits and reducing taxes on the wealthy, at everyone elseís expense.

Often, Trump simply lies about what his policies would do. But his aides and the leaders of Congress know they canít always get away with lying. Instead, they create carve-outs. In doing so, they are admitting the truth about the Trump agenda: Itís so bad that they donít want their own voters to live with it.

© 2018 New York Times

Comments
Romano: A Tampa Bay Ďsuperstarí caught in the crosshairs of Trumpís border policy

Romano: A Tampa Bay Ďsuperstarí caught in the crosshairs of Trumpís border policy

At this moment, she is Tampa Bayís most influential export. A smart, accomplished and powerful attorney making life-altering decisions on an international stage.But what of tomorrow? And the day after?When the story of President Donald Trumpís border...
Updated: 9 hours ago
Editorial: A court victory for protecting Floridaís environment

Editorial: A court victory for protecting Floridaís environment

A Tallahassee judge has affirmed the overwhelming intent of Florida voters by ruling that state lawmakers have failed to comply with a constitutional amendment that is supposed to provide a specific pot of money to buy and preserve endangered lands. ...
Updated: 24 minutes ago
Column: Fane Lozmanís long fight to criticize Riviera Beach may go on, Supreme Court rules

Column: Fane Lozmanís long fight to criticize Riviera Beach may go on, Supreme Court rules

Fane Lozman, a consummate citizen-critic of local government affairs, exercised his First Amendment right "to petition the government for a redress of grievances." The government in this case was the city of Riviera Beach.He was led off in handcuffs ...
Published: 06/18/18
PolitiFact Florida: Have more students been killed in schools than soldiers in combat zones?

PolitiFact Florida: Have more students been killed in schools than soldiers in combat zones?

After a student gunman killed 10 people in Santa Fe, Texas, a claim circulated widely on social media that compared the number of deaths in the military with the number of deaths in school shootings.One of the politicians who shared it on social medi...
Published: 06/18/18
Editorial: Trump should stop taking children away from parents at the border

Editorial: Trump should stop taking children away from parents at the border

Innocent children should not be used as political pawns. That is exactly what the Trump administration is doing by cruelly prying young children away from their parents as these desperate families cross the Mexican border in search of a safer, better...
Updated: 4 hours ago

Editorial: ATF should get tougher on gun dealers who violate the law

Gun dealers who break the law by turning a blind eye to federal licensing rules are as dangerous to society as people who have no right to a possess a firearm in the first place. Yet a recent report shows that the federal agency responsible for polic...
Published: 06/17/18
Updated: 06/18/18
Editorial: Encouraging private citizens to step up on transit

Editorial: Encouraging private citizens to step up on transit

The new grass-roots effort to put a transportation package before Hillsborough County voters in November faces a tough slog. Voters rejected a similar effort in 2010, and another in 2016 by elected officials never made it from the gate. But the lates...
Published: 06/15/18
Column: My dad didnít know how to get fit. Iíll do better for my kids.

Column: My dad didnít know how to get fit. Iíll do better for my kids.

On a June afternoon 28 years ago, in the last inning of my Little League teamís annual parents-and-kids game, my father hit a game-winning grand slam. Judging from the uncertain way he ran the bases and his inexplicable head-first slide into home pla...
Published: 06/15/18
Column: What happened in the Trump-Kim meeting and why it matters

Column: What happened in the Trump-Kim meeting and why it matters

Even the most informed observer might struggle to know what to make of the summit meeting between President Donald Trump and Kim Jong Un of North Korea.Colorful theatrics, such as a four-minute video that Trump showed Kim, gave the event an air of su...
Published: 06/15/18
Column: Trumpís summit with Kim shows the dangers of too much self-confidence

Column: Trumpís summit with Kim shows the dangers of too much self-confidence

The summit between President Donald Trump and Kim Jong Un provided the two leaders with the propaganda successes they both craved: Trump can claim he has done something no previous U.S. president had ever done. And Kimís effort to cement his legitima...
Published: 06/15/18