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Tampabay.com - Reporting with a camera

Trump in Tampa: A rally seen through one lens

Security patrols the fence during a rally for Republican Presidential Candidate Donald Trump at the University of South Florida Sun Dome on Friday evening, February 12, 2016 in Tampa.

[ZACK WITTMAN | Times]

Security patrols the fence during a rally for Republican Presidential Candidate Donald Trump at the University of South Florida Sun Dome on Friday evening, February 12, 2016 in Tampa.

My individual assignment for the Donald Trump rally was to wander around the rally and make exclusive images, which I was more than happy to do. This was my second time photographing a Trump rally, and generally, they try to confine media to a pen on the floor that is at least 50 feet away from the podium where he speaks.

Sometimes, I get caught up with light and composition of my photography while people and moments sometimes fall to the wayside. Photojournalism is all about people, so I’ve been trying to work on this and focus on the individuals with portraits. I decided to really focus on portraits at the Trump rally, and I talked to several people about why they supported him. The portraits reveal the variety of Trump supporters, showing an array of ages, races and genders that came out to support the Republican frontrunner. …

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Photo gallery: Donald Trump draws big crowd to USF Sun Dome in Tampa

Republican presidential hopeful Donald Trump addresses the crowd at the USF Sun Dome on Friday night in Tampa.

LOREN ELLIOTT | Times

Republican presidential hopeful Donald Trump addresses the crowd at the USF Sun Dome on Friday night in Tampa.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump drew a huge crowd Friday night at the Sun Dome in Tampa. 

Lines formed hours before the rally was set to start at 7 p.m. Trump entered the arena at the University of South Tampa about 7:40 p.m. and spoke for about an hour. 

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Celebrating Black History Month in Florida: First black ballplayers at Yankees’ spring training (1954)

(February 4, 1954) Original published caption: “Yesterday was a big day for the two players. They met Yankee Manager Casey Stengel just before beginning workouts. Elston Howard, right, is being tried as a catcher while Eddie Andrews will show his wares as a pitcher. They are the first Negroes to be members of a Yankee tryout camp here. Both saw service with minor league clubs last season.”

[Johnnie Evans | Times]

(February 4, 1954) Original published caption: “Yesterday was a big day for the two players. They met Yankee Manager Casey Stengel just before beginning workouts. Elston Howard, right, is being tried as a catcher while Eddie Andrews will show his wares as a pitcher. They are the first Negroes to be members of a Yankee tryout camp here. Both saw service with minor league clubs last season.”

For Black History Month, we culled through our archives looking for photos showing various historical "firsts" by African-Americans in Florida. Today's installment features Elston Howard, who in 1955 became the first black to play in the major leagues for the New York Yankees. This photo shows Howard (right) in 1954, when he (along with Eddie Andrews) were the first black players to be invited by the New York Yankees to spring training in St. Petersburg.

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An inside look at a story about the eloquence of love

Bob Mitchell, 74, hates shopping and hates the wind chimes on his porch. He loves Nancy Hicks, 69, who has aphasia and needs his help to do the things she loves, like shopping and hanging wind chimes on their porch. Aphasia is a condition that leaves a person's intelligence and personality intact, but robs them of their ability to communicate. In Nancy's case, she can only say "baa."

[John Pendygraft | Times]

Bob Mitchell, 74, hates shopping and hates the wind chimes on his porch. He loves Nancy Hicks, 69, who has aphasia and needs his help to do the things she loves, like shopping and hanging wind chimes on their porch. Aphasia is a condition that leaves a person's intelligence and personality intact, but robs them of their ability to communicate. In Nancy's case, she can only say "baa."

"Images and written texts not only tell us things differently, they tell us different things."

It's a great day to be a journalist when, on a routine daily assignment, something unexpected and beautiful crosses your path.

Like Bob and Nancy.

A stroke left Nancy with aphasia and she can only say one word: "baa." It did not affect her intelligence. Bob had only been dating Nancy for 10 months when she had the stroke, and has stood by her for nearly 8 years since. They were just so cute together.

So what to do with a love story?

I told Bob and Nancy's story in video, stills and text. Each tell us different things about the same special couple.

Professor and filmmaker David MacDougall wrote that "images and written texts not only tell us things differently, they tell us different things."

I also took two portraits. One taken with a digital camera, and one with a 1920's style billow camera on film. The lighting set up was the same but the process is completely different.

With a digital camera you talk, click/flash, talk, click/flash, talk, click/flash. It is dynamic. Often the camera is in front of your face as you talk. The camera and strobes are at the center of it. …

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Reader Photo of the Month poll: 5 great photos from Tampa Bay Times readers to choose from

(Published January 1, 2016) Kingfisher in the morning.

[Submitted by Ken Proctor, St. Petersburg, FL.]

(Published January 1, 2016) Kingfisher in the morning.

We're starting something new this year. Every month we'll choose five reader-submitted photos and ask you to help pick the one that will win the coveted title of Reader Photo of the Month.

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From the digital darkroom: Some advice from a pro on capturing a picture perfect sunrise

IPhone photo taken at sunrise on a pond in Brandon. Winter produces spectacular sunrises and sunset due to high clouds that catch the suns rays.

[Skip O'Rourke | Times]

IPhone photo taken at sunrise on a pond in Brandon. Winter produces spectacular sunrises and sunset due to high clouds that catch the suns rays.

Here are some gorgeous examples of sunrise photos taken by staff photographers Jim Damaske and Skip O'Rourke.

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Photo gallery: Following the big blizzard as it pushes across U.S.

Deborah Ellison covers Raniyah Shabazz, 4, in a blanket as they walk in the snow Friday morning in Nashville, Tenn.

Samuel M. Simpkins | Tennessean via AP

Deborah Ellison covers Raniyah Shabazz, 4, in a blanket as they walk in the snow Friday morning in Nashville, Tenn.

The blizzard menacing the Eastern United States started dumping snow in Virginia, Tennessee and other parts of the South on Friday as millions of people in the storm's path prepared for icy roads, possible power outages and other treacherous conditions, the Associated Press reports. 

Snowfall as heavy as 1 to 3 inches an hour could last for 24 hours or more in some areas, said meteorologist Paul Kocin with the National Weather Service. That puts estimates at more than 2 feet for Washington, a foot to 18 inches for Philadelphia and 8 inches to a foot in New York. 

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Caption contest #15 finalists: Which clever caption do you like best?

Which clever caption do you like best?

[Undated photo from Times files]

Which clever caption do you like best?

Below you will find the top five captions submitted for caption contest #15. We'll leave it to you to determine which caption gets the most votes. (Voting ends Friday, January 29, at 8:30 a.m.)

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On the eve of Roe vs. Wade anniversary, a 'memorial for the unborn' gets planted in Largo

(January 21, 2016) Debi Vinnedge, of Largo, secures a wooden cross in the lawn at St. Catherine of Siena Catholic Church in Largo while working on the church's Respect Life Ministries' Memorial for the Unborn, which is placed each year before the anniversary of Roe v. Wade, the landmark United States Supreme Court case on abortion. On January 22, 1973, the court ruled 7-2 that a right to privacy under the Due Process Clause of the 14th Amendment extended to a woman's decision to have an abortion, but that this right must be balanced against the state's two legitimate interests in regulating abortions: protecting women's health and protecting the potentiality of human life. The controversial decision prompted a national debate that continues today and has divided much of the United States into two camps when it comes to the topic of abortion. According to the Roman Catholic Diocese of St. Petersburg, 285 youth and chaperones from ten different Tampa Bay area parishes and schools are leaving today to join the hundreds of thousands of people expected to participate in the March for Life, the annual rally protesting abortion, held each year in Washington, D.C., on the anniversary of the Roe v. Wade decision.

[Douglas R. Clifford | Times]

(January 21, 2016) Debi Vinnedge, of Largo, secures a wooden cross in the lawn at St. Catherine of Siena Catholic Church in Largo while working on the church's Respect Life Ministries' Memorial for the Unborn, which is placed each year before the anniversary of Roe v. Wade, the landmark United States Supreme Court case on abortion. On January 22, 1973, the court ruled 7-2 that a right to privacy under the Due Process Clause of the 14th Amendment extended to a woman's decision to have an abortion, but that this right must be balanced against the state's two legitimate interests in regulating abortions: protecting women's health and protecting the potentiality of human life. The controversial decision prompted a national debate that continues today and has divided much of the United States into two camps when it comes to the topic of abortion. According to the Roman Catholic Diocese of St. Petersburg, 285 youth and chaperones from ten different Tampa Bay area parishes and schools are leaving today to join the hundreds of thousands of people expected to participate in the March for Life, the annual rally protesting abortion, held each year in Washington, D.C., on the anniversary of the Roe v. Wade decision.

(January 21, 2016) Debi Vinnedge of Largo secures a wooden cross in the lawn at St. Catherine of Siena Catholic Church in Largo while working on the church's Respect Life Ministries' Memorial for the Unborn, which is placed each year before the anniversary of Roe vs. Wade, the landmark United States Supreme Court case on abortion. On January 22, 1973, the court ruled 7-2 that a right to privacy under the Due Process Clause of the 14th Amendment extended to a woman's decision to have an abortion, but that this right must be balanced against the state's two legitimate interests in regulating abortions: protecting women's health and protecting the potentiality of human life. The controversial decision prompted a national debate that continues today and has divided much of the United States into two camps when it comes to the topic of abortion. According to the Roman Catholic Diocese of St. Petersburg, 285 youth and chaperones from ten different Tampa Bay area parishes and schools are leaving today to join the hundreds of thousands of people expected to participate in the March for Life, the annual rally protesting abortion, held each year in Washington, D.C., on the anniversary of the Roe vs. Wade decision.

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Caption contest #16: Show us your wits! Send us a clever caption for this image.

Can you come up with a clever caption for this image?

[1967 Photo by Tampa Bay Times staff photographer Bernie Oram]

Can you come up with a clever caption for this image?

We invite you to come up with a caption for the above photo and send it to us at alleyes@tampabay.com. We'll pick five captions to feature in a poll next week to select the weekly winner.

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Photo gallery: Baby panda Bei Bei is introduced to the public (w/video)

Giant panda cub Bei Bei, seen through glass, tries to get out of his box as he awakes at the National Zoo in Washington on Saturday, Jan. 16, 2016. The cub, born Aug. 22, made his public debut Saturday, though zoo members have been able to see him since Jan. 8.

Jose Luis Magana | Associated Press

Giant panda cub Bei Bei, seen through glass, tries to get out of his box as he awakes at the National Zoo in Washington on Saturday, Jan. 16, 2016. The cub, born Aug. 22, made his public debut Saturday, though zoo members have been able to see him since Jan. 8.

For his public debut, Bei Bei mostly snoozed flat on his back - a big puff of black and white fur with fluffy black ears curled in a box corner of his mother's den at the National Zoo.

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Instant photo poll: Black-and-white or color? Which do you like best?

Black-and-white or color? Which do you prefer?

[Skip O'Rourke | Times]

Black-and-white or color? Which do you prefer?

Black-and-white or color? Picture editors and photographers alike often ponder that question and ultimate decision. When a picture has striking graphic lines that create direction and movement within a frame, combined with overall monotone qualities, it's natural for the visually-minded to imagine what the image would look like in black or color. It's a fun exercise when many subjective opinions are taken into account. We'd thought you'd like to get in on the action too! Which do you prefer? Black and white or color? Place your vote below, and feel free to leave comments too.

 

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Caption contest #14 finalists: Which clever caption do you like best?

Which clever caption do you like best?

[1932 photo from Times files]

Which clever caption do you like best?

Below are the top five captions submitted for caption contest #14. We'll leave it to you to decide which one is #1. (Voting ends Friday, January 22, at 8:30 a.m.)

Full Story

Caption contest #15: Show us your wits! Send us a clever caption for this image.

Can you come up with a clever caption for this image?

Undated photo from Times files

Can you come up with a clever caption for this image?

We invite you to come up with a caption for the above photo and send it to us at alleyes@tampabay.com. We'll pick five captions to feature in a poll next week to select the weekly winner.

Full Story

Photo gallery: The many faces of Alan Rickman (including the unforgettable Severus Snape)

(2004) Alan Rickman as Severus Snape, from "Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban."

[Times files]

(2004) Alan Rickman as Severus Snape, from "Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban."

From the Associated Press: "British actor Alan Rickman, a classically-trained stage star and sensual screen villain in the "Harry Potter" saga and other films, has died. He was 69. Rickman's family said Thursday that the actor had died after a battle with cancer. Trained at the prestigious Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, Rickman was often cast as the bad guy; with his rich, languid voice he could invest evil with wicked, irresistible relish."

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