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Tampabay.com - Reporting with a camera

All Eyes: The story behind the €'American Dream'€™ photo at West Point that went viral

Tears tream down the face of West Point Cadet Alix Idrache during the 2016 commencement ceremony at the U.S. Military Academy.

Photo by Staff Sgt. Vito T. Bryant | U.S. Army

Tears tream down the face of West Point Cadet Alix Idrache during the 2016 commencement ceremony at the U.S. Military Academy.

As 2nd Lt. Alix Schoelcher Idrache stood at attention during the commencement ceremony at West Point, N.Y., on Saturday, he was overcome with emotion. Tears rolled down both cheeks, but his gloved left hand held firm on his white, gold and black "cover," the dress headgear that Army cadets wear.

The photograph of Idrache, by Army Staff Sgt. Vito T. Bryant, was published Tuesday on the Facebook page of West Point's U.S. Military Academy, and it almost immediately went viral. Part of that is Idrache's background: He worked his way through one of the nation's most prestigious military schools after immigrating to the United States from Haiti, earning his citizenship and serving for two years as an enlisted soldier with the Maryland Army National Guard, according to Army records.

"I woke up this morning and found my face all over Facebook and with it myriad of amazing comments about my accomplishments," Idrache wrote Tuesday on Facebook. "I am humbled and shocked at the same time. Thank you for giving me a shot at the American Dream and may God bless America, the greatest country on earth."

On West Point's Instagram page, he left another message thanking people for their support. Bryant, the photographer, "captured a moment that I will never forget," Idrache said. He credited past generations of soldiers and Capt. Kristen Griest, 1st Lt. Shaye Haver and Maj. Lisa Jaster, the three West Point graduates who last year became the first women to graduate from the Army's grueling Ranger School.

"Three things came to mind and led to those tears," Idrache wrote. "The first is where I started. I am from Haiti and never did I imagine that such honor would be one day bestowed on me. The second is where I am. Men and women who have preserved the very essence of the human condition stood in that position and took the same oath. Men who preserved the Union [in] a dark period of this country's history. Men who scaled the face of adversity and liberated Europe from fascism . . . Women like CPT Griest, LT Haver, MAJ Jaster who rewrote the narrative and challenged the status quo to prove themselves worthy of being called Rangers."

The third thing Idrache thought about, he wrote, is his future. Shortly after he leaves West Point, he will report to Fort Rucker, Alabama, to start flight school.

"Knowing that one day I will be a pilot is humbling beyond words," Idrache wrote. "I could not help but be flooded with emotions knowing that I will be leading these men and women who are willing to give their all to preserve what we value as the American way of life. To me, that is the greatest honor. Once again, thank you."

Idrache was a leader in his class of 950 cadets. According to a West Point news release, he was named a regimental commander last summer. Army officials at West Point said that he was on leave Thursday and not available for comment. His home town is listed as New Carrollton, Md., a Washington suburb.

 

[Last modified: Thursday, May 26, 2016 6:56pm]

    

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