Bucs Beat

Rick Stroud, Greg Auman and Matt Baker

Bucs' all-offense draft rare in NFL history

The Bucs completed their 2014 draft taking only players on the offensive side of the ball, and while that sweep is unprecedented in Tampa Bay's 39 drafts as a franchise, it's also in rare company in NFL history.

When the Bucs took six offensive players and zero on defense, they became just the third team since the start of the common draft in 1967 to take at least four players, all on offense. The 1985 Cleveland Browns took seven offensive players -- eight if you count Bernie Kosar in the supplemental draft that year -- and the 1997 Kansas City Chiefs took six offensive players, including future Hall of Fame tight end Tony Gonzalez.

There are a handful of offense-only drafts by teams who dealt away most of their picks -- the 1999 Saints rather famously traded all their picks to land running back Ricky Williams, for instance. Other teams -- the 2009 Jets, the 2003 Redskins, the 1997 49ers -- had three picks, all on offense. The farther you go back, the harder it is to go all-offense because the draft used to be longer -- the 1969 Lions had only offensive players until the 10th round, which no longer even exists.

It's even harder to find an all-defense draft -- the closest you come are a pair of drafts -- the 2009 Saints and 1982 Chargers -- where a team took four defensive players and a punter.

Bucs coach Lovie Smith has come close to going all-in on one side of the ball before -- in 2005, his first four picks with the Bears were on offense, with no defensive players until the sixth roundd, and the next year, he went exclusively defense with five picks before taking an offensive player in the sixth.

The closest the Bucs came to an all-offense draft is their first four picks -- in 1997 (including Warrick Dunn and Reidel Anthony), in 1994 (Trent Dilfer and Errict Rhett) and in 1978 (Doug Williams).

[Last modified: Monday, May 12, 2014 9:17am]

    

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