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Rick Stroud, Greg Auman and Matt Baker

Snap counts: Quiet day for McCoy, Moore disappearing fast

Gerald McCoy played in a season-high 90 percent of Tampa Bay's defensive snaps, but had just two tackles to show for it.

OCTAVIO JONES | Times

Gerald McCoy played in a season-high 90 percent of Tampa Bay's defensive snaps, but had just two tackles to show for it.

26

October

A few quick observations from the snap counts in the Bucs' stunning 31-30 loss to the Redskins on Sunday, starting with defensive tackle Gerald McCoy, who played in a season-high 90 percent of Tampa Bay's defensive snaps, but had just two tackles to show for it.

McCoy hadn't played more than 81 percent of the snaps in any of the first five games, which is to say he had roughly half as many plays off as he had in any other game. Some of this is Tony McDaniel being out with a groin injury and Akeem Spence making his season debut in his place, but McCoy went the entire second half without logging any defensive statistics.

Clinton McDonald, more involved by scheme in stopping the run, played half as many snaps as McCoy did and finished with three times as many tackles (six), but before you can deduce that the Bucs played their starters too much Sunday, consider the lack of impact from backups all over the defense.

Of the 10 non-starters who played on defense Sunday, only two had any defensive tackles -- defensive end George Johnson had three and rookie corner Jude Adjei-Barimah had two. The other eight combined for zero tackles in 98 defensive snaps, which might be why coaches kept putting starters back on the field.

Other snap-related notes:

-- CB Sterling Moore is quickly disappearing from the defense. After just 14 snaps as the nickel cornerback in the loss to Carolina, Moore shifted to backup corner, taking only nine snaps in the win against Jacksonville and just two in Sunday's loss. Adjei-Barimah, by comparison, continues to emerge, playing 13 snaps on defense and getting a key tackle on special-teams coverage, where he played as many snaps as any Bucs player.

-- Rookies Jameis Winston, Kwon Alexander, Donovan Smith and Ali Marpet have all played every snap on their side of the ball, six games into the season. The same is true for LB Lavonte David and RT Gosder Cherilus. Alexander has a team-high six passes defensed -- that's almost as many as all the Bucs cornerbacks combined (nine).

-- Definitely a more pronounced edge to Doug Martin in playing time, with 40 snaps Sunday compared to 23 for Charles Sims. That makes it all the more impressive that he would break out for a 49-yard run late in the fourth quarter, and all the more surprising that the Bucs would pull Martin on third-and-goal at the 1 for Sims, who took a wide pitch and was dropped for a 2-yard loss when a 1-yard score would have all but locked up a Bucs victory. Officially, that carry by Sims was his first offensive touch of the second half -- he had one long run late in the third quarter that was brought back by a holding penalty.

-- A few stat notes: Doug Martin is now second in the NFL with 541 rushing yards, and his average of 5.0 yards per carry matches the best of any running back in the NFL's top 10 for yards. Winston has his completion percentage up to 59 percent, which would be the Bucs' best percentage in any season since 2011. They've been under 57 percent in each of the last three seasons.

Kicker Connor Barth -- now 6-for-6 on field goals and 6-for-6 on extra points -- is one of six NFL kickers still perfect on the season. He has much fewer attempts in his two games, but he's in there with Stephen Gostkowski (39-for-39 overall), Steven Hauschka (30), Travis Coons (25), Dan Bailey (23) and Ryan Succop (19).

With another sack Sunday, DE Jacquies Smith is now tied for ninth in the NFL with five sacks, while Gerald McCoy, staying at 4.5 sacks, is tied for second among NFL defensive tackles.

[Last modified: Monday, October 26, 2015 12:54pm]

    

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