Gradebook podcast: What did Florida lawmakers do for (to?) public education?

Russell Hosford, left, Sergeant at Arms of the Florida House and Tim Hay, Sergeant at Arms of the Florida Senate, drop the ceremonial handkerchiefs to signify Sine Die, or the end of the legislative session at the Florida State Capitol in Tallahassee, Fla., Sunday, March 11, 2018. (AP Photo/Mark Wallheiser), The Associated Press
Russell Hosford, left, Sergeant at Arms of the Florida House and Tim Hay, Sergeant at Arms of the Florida Senate, drop the ceremonial handkerchiefs to signify Sine Die, or the end of the legislative session at the Florida State Capitol in Tallahassee, Fla., Sunday, March 11, 2018. (AP Photo/Mark Wallheiser), The Associated Press
Published March 16

It took them a couple of extra days, but Florida lawmakers finally finished their 2018 session this week. They adopted fewer bills than in the past, but adopted another round of mega-bills (HB 7055, SB 7026), logging in at hundreds of pages and dozens of subjects that once upon a time might have stood on their own. And, their K-12 budget with its school safety focus caused angst among superintendents across Florida, who said they can't afford to do all that's asked of them with the money provided. They want Gov. Rick Scott to veto the measure and tell the Legislature to try again. (Not likely.) In today's podcast, reporters Jeff Solochek and Emily Mahoney review all the action after it's been in the rear-view mirror for a couple of days.

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