Florida education news: Testing, campaigns, security and more

Florida education commissioner Pam Stewart chats with State Board of Education member Gary Chartrand before a board meeting in Largo. [Jeffrey S. Solochek | Times]
Florida education commissioner Pam Stewart chats with State Board of Education member Gary Chartrand before a board meeting in Largo. [Jeffrey S. Solochek | Times]
Published July 6 2018

SCHOOL GRADES: Education commissioner Pam Stewart debunks allegations by six lawmakers that three school districts attempted to game the state's school grading system with their civics test administration. "At this time, we do not have any evidence that the districts you listed have done anything that is in violation of the law or improperly manipulated the accountability system," Stewart wrote to the lawmakers. More from Bradenton Herald, Florida Times-Union, Herald-Tribune.

CAMPAIGN TRAIL: A Pasco County School Board candidate accuses the district of smearing her candidacy over a Facebook post.

SECURITY: New Florida law makes it a felony to threaten a school over social media, WINK reports.

TEACHER EVALUATIONS: A Florida Southern College researcher studies the unquantifiable factors that show teachers' value, the News Chief reports.

SCHOOL LUNCH: The Volusia County school district plans to overhaul its lunch menu to make meals more appealing to students, the Daytona Beach News-Journal reports.

MOST UNWELCOME REMINDER: Most Florida students will return to classes in just about a month, the News Service of Florida reports.

BAD ACTS: A Miami mom accuses her son's kindergarten teacher of calling him a "loser" — and offers a recording to back it up, the Miami Herald reports.

CAREER EDUCATION: Collier County will get a new job training center at Immokalee Technical College, the Naples Daily News reports.

EARLY EDUCATION: Many Florida prekindergartners struggled with the state's kindergarten readiness test, the Orlando Sentinel reports.

TEST SCORES: The score students need to pass Florida's Algebra I test is lower than many parents might expect, Florida Phoenix reports.

Advertisement