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Education news and notes from Tampa Bay and Florida

Report: As minority male students go, so goes the U.S.

21

June

Here's another good reason to worry about the generally poor academic performance of minority male students: Demographics. A report released yesterday by the College Board Advocacy & Policy Center offers a slew of familiar statistics, but also frames it with a bigger picture: The U.S. is fast becoming a majority minority country, and within each race/ethnicity it's the guys who are lagging in school.

"In short, women are driving the college completion rate of the entire nation, and men are detracting from the ability of the nation to reach the goal of once again becoming the educational leader in the world," the report says "If we are to reach this important national objective, we must explore ways to ensure that all males, especially members of minority groups, are able to earn college degrees at much higher rates."

The report concludes with these recommendations:

* Policymakers must make improving outcomes for young men of color a national priority.

* Increase community, business and school partnerships to provide mentoring and support to young men of color.

* Reform education to ensure that all students, including young men of color, are college and career ready when they graduate from high school.

* Improve teacher education programs and provide professional development that includes cultural- and gender-responsive
training.
(The report singles out the Teachers for a New Era program at Florida A&M University and the Call Me MISTER program, based at Clemson, which is expanding in Florida.)

* Create culturally appropriate persistence and retention programs that provide wraparound services to increase college completion for men of color.

* Produce more research and conduct more studies that strengthen the understanding of the challenges faced by males of color and provide evidence-based solutions to these challenges.

 

[Last modified: Monday, June 20, 2011 6:45pm]

    

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