Gradebook

Education news and notes from Tampa Bay and Florida

Today's education news: Field trips, spelling bees, charter school rules and more

30

April

Brn_bee050109_a_66329c HEADED TO THE BEE: Brandon Academy student Alina Meador can't say she's not good at spelling any more -- she's headed to the national spelling bee. (Times photo, Skip O'Rourke)

FOLLOW THE RULES:
Hillsborough Community College needs to adhere to Ybor City's height restrictions if it wants to win approval for a new student services building.

125 AND GOING STRONG: St. Anthony Catholic School celebrates its continued success.

GETTING READY: Principal David Brown prepares Strawberry Crest High for its fall opening.

TO LIFE! Students at Longleaf Elementary spend 15 minutes a day learning about how to live a healthier, longer life -- the online studies are the highlight of their day.

GUILTY: A former PHCC instructor pleads guilty to forging her nurse's license, one of the credentials she needed to get hired.

IT'S GOOD TO BE STEINBRENNER: Hillsborough's new Steinbrenner High will have close ties to the Yankees, with plenty of sports-themed curriculum.

CHARTER SCHOOL FAILURE: Imagine School's plans for Riverview falter.

FOCUS: Northwest Florida State College needs to reset its priorities for student learning and away from political cronyism, the Times editorializes.

FEWER FIELD TRIPS: Florida schools are not alone in canceling student trips as a way to save money, USA Today reports.

FINGERS CROSSED: Florida university leaders are hoping for lesser budget cuts than initially proposed, but still are preparing for the worst, the Tallahassee Democrat reports. • House budget negotiators did agree to come closer to the Senate higher ed spending plan, which made smaller reductions, the AP reports.

NEW CHARTER RULES: The Legislature sends a bill that would force more accountability on charter schools to the governor, the Orlando Sentinel reports.

THE NAME GAME: Manatee Community College president Lars Hafner says he did not violate the Sunshine Law in changing the school's name to State College of Florida, the Bradenton Herald reports.

FINISH UP AND MOVE ON: Florida lawmakers are considering whether to charge in-state college students extra tuition if they take too many credits, the Palm Beach Post reports.

RACIAL BALANCE THREATENED: A select committee finds that Orange's plan to close six schools would undermine the district's desegregation effort, the Orlando Sentinel reports.

STARTING OVER: A struggling Escambia school will get a brand new staff to give it new life, the Pensacola News-Journal reports.

[Last modified: Tuesday, May 25, 2010 10:22am]

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