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Gradebook

Education news and notes from Tampa Bay and Florida

Today's news

Images_2 SCIENTOLOGY AT SCHOOL: A curriculum and study method developed by Scientology founder L. Ron Hubbard makes its way into a growing number of classrooms. Backers say it's a sensible way to teach and learn, while opponents see it as an insidious way to spread the controversial religion. A Tampa church that tutors youngsters also embraces the program.

IT'S GOTTA GO:  The Pinellas school choice program is about to change, possibly in a major way. "Let's face it, " board member Peggy O'Shea said. "The public does not like the choice plan we have today. We've got to change it."

STRANDED SCHOOL: A developers squabble has left Pasco County's newest high school, which opens in August, without a road leading to the campus. District officials are searching for alternatives, and are really glad they won't have car-driving seniors at the school for a year.

IT MUST HAVE BEEN THE TEST:
First, the state's third graders logged in the first performance dip in the history of FCAT reading. Next, the fourth graders who did so well last year (a different group of kids, of course) didn't look all that stellar on their reading results (on a different, norm-referenced exam, mind you). So now educators are calling for a review of the FCAT to see what's going on, the Palm Beach Post reports.

NOW THAT'S A BIG SCHOOL:
Cypress Bay High in Weston has 5,200 students. And it expects even more next year. Worse, the options to ease crowding remain distant. What's a district to do? The most likely solution is double sessions, the Miami Herald reports.

CAN THEY DO A SUSHI LESSON, TOO? Select Volusia middle school students get to work on aquaculture projects like treating sick fish, but also raising beluga sturgeon (think caviar), the Orlando Sentinel reports.

ALL ABOUT TRUST: The academic year had some big stories in higher education, like the naming of a new president at Harvard. But the underlying theme, AP education writer Justin Pope suggests, was dishonesty. What does that say about the people who are supposed to be role models for young adults?

[Last modified: Tuesday, May 25, 2010 9:17am]

    

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