Clear69° WeatherClear69° Weather

Gradebook

Education news and notes from Tampa Bay and Florida

Today's news

25

July

01florida_capitol SPECIAL SESSION: With tax revenue slowing, lawmakers call a special session to begin Sept. 18 so they can revamp the state's recently adopted budget. Education and social services, which account for about two-thirds of the state spending, are expected to be hit hardest.

COMMISSIONER SEARCH CONTINUES:
Just 26 people have applied to lead the $23-billion Florida education system. To put that in perspective, Hillsborough County had more candidates for superintendent during its 2005 search.

HOT TOPICS: The Hernando School Board plans to grapple with attendance zones, field trip rules and sibling access to magnet schools this week. All crowd pleasers, to be sure.

SAFETY FIRST: Overhauling the Hillsborough school busing bureaucracy may be a noble goal. But not when the district's proposals could put children in harm's way, as a recommendation to do away with a bus route in rural Wimauma could do, the Times editorial board says.

SUPERINTENDENT'S BONUS:
Duval County's achievement gap grew, while student gains shrunk. Yet its top educator still will get a bonus for progress made toward achieving big goals, the Florida Times-Union reports.

PUBLIC MONEY, RELIGIOUS SCHOOL?
A discussion over the location and curriculum of a new Hebrew-language charter school ignites a heated debate over whether Broward County taxpayers would be funding what should be a private school, the Sun-Sentinel reports.

UNFAIR PRACTICE: The Public Employee Relations Committee finds that the Manatee school district improperly forced some teachers to work an extra duty period every seven days, the Bradenton Herald reports.

BUDGET WOES: Broward school officials plan to add teachers, give raises and build new schools, but fret over possible cuts, the Miami Herald reports. Similar worries on a smaller scale for Flagler County, the Daytona Beach News-Journal reports.

READING, 'RITHMETIC AND ...
Much less of everything else. Schools' increased focus on the two R's since the implementation of No Child Left Behind has meant cutbacks just about every other subject, report the Washington Post and NY Times.

CLASS SIZE LESSONS: A southern California school district continues to struggle with its class-size reduction implementation, as more evidence of lying to gain state money is unearthed, the LA Times reports. A story to keep in mind as Florida moves to the next level - classroom counts - in its class-size plans.

[Last modified: Tuesday, May 25, 2010 9:20am]

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...