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Gradebook

Education news and notes from Tampa Bay and Florida

Today's news

14

August

Tb_skul_450 EAT YOUR VEGGIES: The Pinellas school district earns high marks for its healthful offerings in cafeterias. The Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine praises the availability of vegetables in elementary schools in the district, which got rid of the deep-fat fryers years ago. (Times photo, Cheri Diez)

CRAMMING: The Pinellas School Board is working against a self-imposed deadline of Aug. 23 to put the finishing touches on its plans to radically alter student assignment.

WHO'S YOUR TEACHER? The annual letter home to Hillsborough parents might be a little confusing this year. The directions telling you how to match the code on the outside to the teacher on the inside are gone, as the school district tries to follow bulk mailing rules.

HELP WANTED: Teachers return to school this week, but some principals still have some classrooms to fill. In Pasco, they say they'll rely on subs while seeking for the right person to meet their schools' needs.

WEAK ETHICS RULES: An audit turns up questionable dealings in the business relationship between the Broward school district and CELT Corp., one of its technology vendors, the Sun-Sentinel reports.

GOOD FUNDRAISERS ARE HARD TO FIND:
Florida Atlantic University is having trouble hiring a new leader for its foundation in the wake of the messy departure of its former chief, the Palm Beach Post reports.

ON BOARD BY MONDAY: The Collier School Board chairman intends to have a new superintendent hired by the weekend, the Naples Daily News reports. At least one other board member calls the plan "ludicrous."

NOT INSTRUCTION: A member of the Colorado State Board of Education suggests that schools should not get state money for counting time spent passing between classes as instructional time, the Rocky Mountain News reports. He says the state will improperly spend $145-million on passing periods.

THANKS FOR COMING: A Dallas-area school district will offer students and teachers incentives for perfect or near-perfect attendance. Leaders hope to save money on subs and sick days, the Dallas Morning News reports.

[Last modified: Tuesday, May 25, 2010 9:21am]

    

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