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Gradebook

Education news and notes from Tampa Bay and Florida

Today's news

8

November

Local_univers_2209177 USF LEADERSHIP: Karen White (left), regional chancellor of USF-St. Petersburg, is a top candidate for the presidency at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. Ralph Wilcox will serve as the main campus provost for more than 2 years, while president Judy Genshaft conducts a national search to replace Renu Khator, who now heads the University of Houston.

UNPOPULAR DECISIONS: The Hernando School Board redraws attendance zones, affecting nearly 20 percent of all students. It also ends sibling preferences in magnet school admission.

MS. MANNERS: Spring Hill Elementary teacher Karen Mancuso spends her days teaching kids about responsibility, manners and compassion.

THE FIGHT IS ON: The Palm Beach School Board decides to take on the State Board of Education over charter school authorization, the Sun-Sentinel reports.

FLAWED FCAT? State Rep. Curtis Richardson, a Tallahassee Democrat, assails the state's testing system during a special hearing on education accountability, the Tallahassee Democrat reports.

PUBLIC RECORDS BATTLES: The Palm Beach Post is suing the Palm Beach school district over what the paper says is the district's repeated violation of the state open records law, the Post reports. The parents of a Miami middle school student stabbed to death at school are suing the Miami-Dade district, claiming the district has refused to turn over school security records, the Miami Herald reports.

PASSING THE TRASH: An Ohio teacher who resigned there before he could be fired for "moral turpitude" wound up in a Florida school district, where he now faces charges for soliciting sex from what he thought was a 15-year-old girl, the Columbus Dispatch reports.

WRITING LESSONS: A Lake Worth elementary school coaxes its students, many low-income, many immigrants, to use their lives to inspire their writing and, in the end, their success, the Palm Beach Post reports.

CHARTER CRACKDOWN: Ohio's attorney general becomes the first in the country to try to close failing charter schools. The effort is gaining national attention, the NY Times reports.

[Last modified: Tuesday, May 25, 2010 9:26am]

    

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