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Gradebook

Education news and notes from Tampa Bay and Florida

Today's news

25

January

TUITION UP, ENROLLMENT DOWN: The Board of Governors aims to boost the quality of Florida's public universities, saying it can't continue to do more with less.

MAKING CHANGE PAINLESS: Principal Kathleen Flanagan hopes to make the transition easy for students who come to Smith Middle, Hillsborough County's newest middle school, when it opens in the fall.

REALTORS WRONG: The West Pasco Board of Realtors was off-base in accusing Pasco superintendent Heather Fiorentino of breaking the law with her Amendment 1 information campaign, the Times editorializes.

STUDYING THE N-WORD: A Gibbs High senior seeks to learn where the charged racial epithet came from and why it's now used by teens so casually. His teacher reluctantly agrees. The results are surprising.

Tb_debatemain_450story MAKING THE ELECTION MATTER: South Florida teachers are fashioning lessons to show their students that the politics of the day actually mean something to them, the Sun-Sentinel reports. At one Miami-Dade charter school, students pretend to be the presidential candidates and stage a debate of their own, the Miami Herald reports. (AP photo)

TEACH FOR JACKSONVILLE:
Teach for America's Duval County initiative moves toward a fall debut with the naming of a local executive director, the Florida Times-Union reports. The group hopes to have 50 teachers in at least 10 at-risk schools this fall.

HERE WE GO AGAIN? An unnamed Duval teacher is facing investigation after the Council on American-Islamic Relations complains that the teacher discriminated against Muslims in class, the Florida Times-Union reports.

"TRYING TO FORCE A SQUARE PEG INTO A ROUND HOLE": The Port St. Lucie Planning and Zoning Board recommends denial of Imagine charter school's plans for a new campus, saying the selected site is too small for the number of projected students, the Stuart News reports.

GO AHEAD AND PRAY: The Orange school district reopens its elementary schools, free of charge, to after-hours Bible study clubs, the Orlando Sentinel reports.

NOT FUNNY: A top Lee County student is expelled after playing a practical joke on some teachers, the Naples Daily News reports. His parents are, of course, fighting the penalty.

LEARN AND EARN: Two Georgia schools are paying students who are struggling in math and science to attend study hall for four hours weekly, the AP reports. Critics contend the idea could work in the short term, but once the money dries up, so too might the motivation.

[Last modified: Tuesday, May 25, 2010 9:33am]

    

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