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Gradebook

Education news and notes from Tampa Bay and Florida

Today's news

28

March

OVERHAULING ED GOVERNANCE: The Senate approves a bill that would let voters decide whether to change the way Florida's education systems operate. The House has yet to schedule debate on the measure.

30busesxlarge1 GO AHEAD AND CHOOSE: Hernando's black families can opt out of the district's desegregation-oriented busing plan. It's not a new right, but it's news to many of the families who didn't know the rules had changed. (NY Times photo, 2007)

TEACHER HAD PAST INCIDENTS:
Former Seminole High teacher Thomas J. Anderson faced complaints of inappropriate touching of students before the latest accusation that prompted him to resign his job.

PARENTS PEEVED ABOUT BUSING: No, not the inner city Tampa parents whose kids will be bused. It's the New Tampa parents whose kids' schools will receive the inner city students who are complaining.

COLUMNISTS ON EDUCATION:
Schools' Good Friday lesson: Whatever (Sue Carlton); Hernando County superintendent shakes things up to even things out (Andrew Skerritt)

CHARTERS CHALLENGED: The Ohio Federation of Teachers is questioning the tax status of several charter schools run by White Hat Management Inc. or its affiliates, a group that also has charters in Florida, the Cincinnati Enquirer reports. A bill won Florida Senate approval to require more rigorous scrutiny of the state's charter schools, the Orlando Sentinel reports.

DIP INTO THE RESERVES: Education is critical to Florida's future, so the Legislature should find the money to pay for it, the Sun-Sentinel editorializes.

COLLIER DISTRICT FIGHTS FOR ACCREDITATION:
At least one School Board member thinks the district might not succeed, the Naples Daily News reports.

ENROLLMENT CAP DELAYED: The Board of Governors puts off a decision to limit enrollment in Florida's public universities, the Palm Beach Post reports.

UNITED THEY STAND: Residents of the rural Volusia communities that are slated to lose their elementary schools join forces to fight the decision, the Daytona Beach News-Journal reports.

[Last modified: Tuesday, May 25, 2010 9:38am]

    

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