Thunderstorm86° WeatherThunderstorm86° Weather

Gradebook

Education news and notes from Tampa Bay and Florida

Today's news

27

April

THE EXCEPTION, NOT THE RULE: Most Florida teachers don't get into the kind of trouble that threatens their teaching certificates. But when they do, their stories can be doozies . A year-old state website makes the information easier to find than ever before.

Pac_sanan042708_21103c EVERYONE'S EQUAL: After years of splitting out special education students, San Antonio Elementary tries its hand at inclusion. At first, there was much trepidation. But now it's working out better than expected. (Times photo, Mike Pease)

WHAT TO DO ABOUT CELL PHONES: The Hillsborough school district is looking into how to keep cell phones from interrupting education, but remaining realistic about the phones' real-world uses.

OVERCOMING ADVERSITY: Pasco High senior James Walmer has lost his mom. His dad's in jail. Life hasn't been easy. He works through it all to stay on track and get into college.

TEACHER AIMS FOR BOARD: Lakewood High teacher and coach Sean O'Flannery is the latest to announce his candidacy for Pinellas School Board District 4.

BEHIND CLOSED DOORS: Two key Florida lawmakers get together to hash out budget differences - including education spending - between the House and Senate, the Tallahassee Democrat reports.

A 10-YEAR MAKEOVER: After 10 years in the field, the FCAT is about to change its role in Florida schools, the Herald-Tribune reports.

TWINS TOGETHER? The Florida Senate has adopted a bill that would let multiple-birth siblings remain in the same school classroom if their parents wish. The House has yet to take up the measure, the Orlando Sentinel reports.

IN THE NUMBERS: The Manatee school district may be growing in enrollment, but not all its schools are sharing the wealth, forcing leaders to shift resources, the Bradenton Herald reports.

A MODEL, MAYBE: Two elite South Korean prep schools appear to have cracked the code to getting students accepted at U.S. Ivy League institutions, the NY Times reports. Wouldn't you know it, their methods include rigorous academic work and lots of studying.

[Last modified: Tuesday, May 25, 2010 9:40am]

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...