Clear76° FULL FORECASTClear76° FULL FORECAST
Make us your home page
Instagram

Gradebook

Education news and notes from Tampa Bay and Florida

Today's news

30

March

DONE HAULING KIDS: Retired school buses still can haul, though. Just ask Robbie Aaron, who buys them up and races them at the Bronson Motor Speedway. Watch the action by clicking here.

DONE HELPING KIDS: Retired college computers still can help crime fighting. St. Petersburg College is donating about 1,000 obsolete computers to law enforcement agencies in Guatemala.

FAMU UPDATE: New president James Ammons pledges fiscal integrity and accountability are his top priorities as he takes the helm. There's a lively conversation on FAMU going on here. Meanwhile, the Tallahassee Democrat reports that lawmakers will give financial control of FAMU's College of Engineering to nearby Florida State University.

STAR, MAP, WHATEVER: Pasco County teachers aren't really interested in rushing into a new performance pay plan. They'd rather take some time, do it right. District officials hope to grab the state cash, and prepare to begin negotiations next week. Gov. Crist signed the new performance pay law yesterday. Texas lawmakers, by contrast, rejected a statewide performance pay law, moving instead to put more money into teacher raises, the Dallas Morning News reports.

FROM THE EDITORIAL PAGE: Lawmakers' engage in "doublespeak" as they defend their plans for public school funding and property taxes, the editorial board says.

FIX CHARTERS: Looks like lawmakers read the Orlando Sentinel's investigative project about charter schools. The Sentinel now reports that education committee leaders are calling for fixes.

GETTING IN IS HARD TO DO: Harvard College rejected 91 percent of applicants this year, its highest rate ever, Bloomberg News reports.

NOT WITH THEIR PAPERS: The anti-plagiarism company Turnitin uses a vast database of student writings to help schools and colleges determine if students are cheating on their papers. A group of students from Virginia and Arizona are suing, saying they never gave the company permission to use their work, the Washington Post reports.

[Last modified: Tuesday, May 25, 2010 9:15am]

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...