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Education news and notes from Tampa Bay and Florida

Florida superintendents continue push to change dual enrollment funding

19

December

Florida's superintendents association is hard at work trying to undo dual enrollment funding changes that lawmakers put in place for the current year at the request of college presidents.

A committee met for a couple of months to craft a white paper that members hope will convince the Legislature to stop charging school districts tuition and other state college costs for dual-enrollment students, among other things.

In the paper, the superintendents note that until 2013 the colleges would only accept high school students into courses on a "space available basis," meaning that the course would have been taught regardless. They argue that the dual enrollment students therefore generated no costs to the colleges, as the instructor was paid for and the schools provided the instructional materials.

The superintendents are proposing these steps:

- Expand choice in acceleration programs for public school students by clarifying in statute that school districts may send students outside the statutorily specified service area. Virtual courses and varied programs among colleges make this requirement obsolete and fails to apply to colleges the values of choice and the competitive marketplace that the Legislature has required of school districts.

- Repeal the requirement that school districts pay tuition and other state college costs for dually enrolled students.

- Ensure parity in the articulation agreement process when articulation agreements are negotiated between school districts and state colleges.

- Authorize articulation agreements to be multi-year agreements that remain in force until amended.

- Specify a cap on the cost of textbooks or require that colleges utilize the same textbook for at least 3 year.

Read the superintendents' white paper for more details.

[Last modified: Thursday, December 19, 2013 10:15am]

    

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