Gadgets & Gizmos

From the staff of the Tampa Bay Times

World Cup: What you need to see USA-Germany today

Posted a story this morning about what you'll need to watch the USA-Germany World Cup match that starts in about 10 minutes. Not much I haven't mentioned here before, but check it out.

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Old but still so good: Everyday technology we're getting wrong

BuzzFeed Video

This BuzzFeed video is, like, four months old — but @NewsBreaker tweeted a link to it on ora.tv today, makes it worth mentioning. Some are already pretty well known (the BuzzFeed folks would have a lot less trouble with that four-finger pinch gesture on their iPads if they tried a five-finger pinch instead), but there were some I'd never heard before this (OMG HOW TO COIL CABLES). It's short, and I've embedded it below. And you won't lose anything by muting the goofy music:

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World Cup fans: Here's a full schedule with TV listings and legal streaming options

David Pogue just tweeted a fantastic link to liveschedules.net. The streaming options are pretty simple if you're an English speaker in the United States with a cable subscription that includes ESPN, but there's still a lot of useful info here.

Of course, tampabay.com offers the AP's schedule widget at tampabay.com/worldcup.

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'Daily Show' destroys claims of Google Glass 'discrimination'

Google co-founder Sergey Brin wears a Google Glass device.

Associated Press (2013)

Google co-founder Sergey Brin wears a Google Glass device.

Google Glass is an interesting case. All the buzz these days is about wearable technology, and the concept of a pair of glasses that could minimize distractions while offering useful, relevant information in an unobtrusive manner has some appeal. That being said, there's no question that the way this particular product has been executed has provoked a reaction from people who aren't sure whether Glass wearers are taking photos or video of them. (Understandably so. Would you feel comfortable in a restroom while someone was holding up a camera?)

But regardless of where you fall on this particular debate, Comedy Central's Daily Show cut hilariously to the heart of the matter last week, as always (video player below):

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It's probably easier to watch the World Cup on your phone or tablet than you think

Oscar of Brazil fights off Sime Vrsaljko of Croatia during the opening match of the World Cup.

Getty Images

Oscar of Brazil fights off Sime Vrsaljko of Croatia during the opening match of the World Cup.

Most of the time, watching big sports events live online is a pain. Typicallly it involves paying for a subscription or messing with illicit live streams that (rightly) give you the heebie-jeebies. I figured it would be the same way for the World Cup — and as a casual fan at most, there was pretty much no way I was paying for the privilege or dealing with the headache.

But it's really amazingly easy, and pretty much free.

I say "pretty much" because you do need to have a cable subscription that includes ESPN, and it's safe to assume you're paying for that. But if you do, and your cable network is supported by ESPN's WatchESPN app, you'll be able to watch every single World Cup match on your Apple iPhone, iPod touch or iPad (running iOS 4.0 or later) or Android Mobile or tablet device, including the Kindle Fire (running Android 2.3.3 or later) without paying an additional cent. Download the app, sign in using an account you create with your TV provider, and you're all set. On a laptop or desktop PC, go to watchespn.com, and you'll be able to see matches from there, too. …

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If you have an iPhone, iPad or a Mac, Apple just gave you a ton of nifty stuff to look forward to

Apple senior vice president of software engineering Craig Federighi speaks about new updates to Apple's hardware and software Monday during Apple's Worldwide Developers Conference at the Moscone West center in San Francisco.

Getty Images

Apple senior vice president of software engineering Craig Federighi speaks about new updates to Apple's hardware and software Monday during Apple's Worldwide Developers Conference at the Moscone West center in San Francisco.

Apple unveiled the latest iteration of its operating system software for Macs today, calling it OS X Yosemite. A major theme of the announcement is a feature Apple calls Continuity, which aims to make your Mac and your iPhone and iPad work more seamlessly together.

The feature aims to make it easier to start an email on your iPad, for example, and finish it on your Mac (or vice versa). Your MacBook will automatically connect to your iPhone, letting you use it as a speakerphone to place and receive calls while your phone stays in your pocket. SMS texts will now appear in Apple's messaging software. (On a Mac, iMessage currently only shows message conversations with other Apple devices.)

The upgrade will be free, and a public beta will be available this summer. More details are coming later today on Apple's website.

Other new Apple stuff announced today included iOS 8 (new operating software to run Apple's iPhones, iPads and iPods) and new features of interest to software developers. Here's the Associated Press's breakdown of today's consumer-oriented announcements:

Read the AP's full article here.

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