Clear65° FULL FORECASTClear65° FULL FORECAST
Make us your home page
Instagram

The Feed

What you're talking about today

From 'Downton Abbey' to 'Belgravia': Julian Fellowes new online novel

Julian Fellowes, author of the new novel 'Belgravia,' hoists one of his Emmy awards in November 2015.

Associated Press

Julian Fellowes, author of the new novel 'Belgravia,' hoists one of his Emmy awards in November 2015.

4

January

Chins up, all you sad Downton Abbey fans. That Anglophiles' delight might be nearing the end of its run, but its creator has the next veddy British historical fiction/costume extravaganza all teed up.

Julian Fellowes, creator, writer and executive producer of PBS' highest-rated series, has written a new novel. It's coming soon to a screen near you -- and not the one on your television.

Belgravia will be published in a 21st century version of the serial publication of the novels of Charles Dickens and other 19th century authors: an app. A free prologue will apear April 16 at www.julianfellowesbelgravia.com, followed by ten weekly installments. Priced at $1.99 each or $13.99 for the entire series, they will be downloadable as both text and audio, with extras such as music, video, character portraits, family trees and, of course, period fashion. Belgravia will also be published as a hardcover book in July.

According to a release from Fellowes' publisher, Grand Central, Belgravia "is the story of a secret that unravels behind the porticoed doors of London’s grandest postcode. Set in the 1840s when the upper echelons of society began to rub shoulders with the emerging industrial nouveau riche, Belgravia is peopled by a rich cast of characters.  But the story begins on the eve of the Battle of Waterloo in 1815.  At the Duchess of Richmond’s now legendary ball, one family’s life will change forever."

Fellowes -- who is an actor, director, playwright, Oscar and Emmy winner and member of the House of Lords as well as a novelist -- said in the release that Belgravia's online publication is an opportunity to "marry the traditions of the Victorian novel to modern technology."

The countess would not approve, one imagines, but Fellowes' fans likely will.

[Last modified: Monday, January 4, 2016 3:39pm]

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...