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Lou Piniella, George Steinbrenner on Hall of Fame committee ballot

Lou Piniella, a Tampa native, ranks 14th all-time with 1,835 wins during 23 seasons managing the Yankees, Reds, Mariners, Devil Rays and Cubs.

DIRK SHADD | Times

Lou Piniella, a Tampa native, ranks 14th all-time with 1,835 wins during 23 seasons managing the Yankees, Reds, Mariners, Devil Rays and Cubs.

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October

Former Devil Rays manager Lou Piniella and longtime Yankees owner George Steinbrenner are among 10 candidates who will be considered for Baseball Hall of Fame election by committee vote in December.

Piniella, a Tampa native, ranks 14th all-time with 1,835 wins (and 13th with 1,713 losses) during 23 seasons managing the Yankees, Reds, Mariners, Devil Rays and Cubs. Steinbrenner, the longtime Tampa resident, presided over the Yankees' return to championship caliber during a controversial reign that ended with his July 2010 death.

Also on the ballot are former players Harold Baines, Albert Belle, Will Clark, Orel Hershiser, and Mark McGwire; former commissioner Bud Selig and longtime Braves president John Schuerholz as executives; and manager Davey Johnson.

The 16-member Today's Game Era Committee will votes on each candidate during the winter meetings, with 75 percent needed for election.

The Today's Game Era was one of four identifed by the Hall in a recent reorganization of the process for considering veteran players, managers executives and umpires for election.

Here is more from the Hall explaining the process:

The Eras Committees consist of four different electorates: Today's Game (for candidates who made their most indelible contribution to baseball from 1988 to the present); Modern Baseball (for candidates who made their most indelible contribution to baseball from 1970 to 1987); Golden Days (for candidates who made their most indelible contribution to baseball from 1950 to 1969); and Early Baseball (for candidates who made their most indelible contribution to baseball prior to 1950).

The Today's Game and Modern Baseball eras will be considered twice each in a five-year period, with the Golden Days era considered once every five years and the Early Baseball era considered once every 10 years.

 

[Last modified: Monday, October 3, 2016 4:15pm]

    

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