Clear70° FULL FORECASTClear70° FULL FORECAST
Make us your home page
Instagram

Merchandise talk about 'A Corpse Wired For Sound,' coming home to Tampa and more

Merchandise, with guitarist David Vassalotti (left) and singer Carson Cox, performed at Mojo Books and Records on Sept. 20, 2016.

Andres Leiva

Merchandise, with guitarist David Vassalotti (left) and singer Carson Cox, performed at Mojo Books and Records on Sept. 20, 2016.

22

September

On Friday, Tampa indie rockers Merchandise will release A Corpse Wired For Sound, their second album on esteemed British label 4AD. That night, the band will play a show in Ybor City (click here for details) before embarking on a three-month tour of North America and Europe.

It's a huge week for a group that occupies a spotlight rarely bestowed on artists from Tampa Bay. Over the past eight years, Merchandise has been anointed a Very Cool Band by outlets like the New York Times, Spin, Billboard, Pitchfork and NME. They're not pop-famous, but they've enjoyed real critical acclaim, and have played huge gigs around the world, representing the city of Tampa in ways few musicians ever have.

Yet Merchandise has a complicated relationship with their hometown, one that on both sides doesn't always feel like love -- especially when, two years ago, singer Carson Cox described Tampa as a "cultural wasteland" in the pages of a British magazine.

"It's been difficult to go from playing a storage unit on 50th and Hillsborough to the Bowery Ballroom," Cox says now. "There was sort of a disconnect there, because we really were a garage, DIY-space band, and we started playing these huge venues, and we didn't sound right at all. I think it's taken us years to not just be comfortable with ourselves, but comfortable with everything."

For our full story on Merchandise, click here.

[Last modified: Thursday, September 22, 2016 11:44am]

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...