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From the staff of the Tampa Bay Times

Martinez wants more time with family

2

December

Mel Martinez, a Cuban immigrant who came to America with nothing and rose to U.S. Housing Secretary and then U.S. Senator, just announced that he will not seek re-election after serving out the next two years of his term. Martinez, 62, said he made the announcement early to give the "many qualified individuals" time to organize and prepare for the open seat election in 2010.

"The Senate is the only federal office carrying a six-year term, so a decision about whether to run for re-election is one that my family and I have carefully considered over the past year. It was a question that came to mind as I wrote my book –- causing me to reflect on the path I’ve chosen, and to think about, with love and gratitude, those who’ve traveled with me.

"The inescapable truth, for me, is that the call to public service is strong, but the call to home, family and lifelong friends is even stronger. So today, with deep love for this country and with sincere gratitude to the people who placed their trust in me, I announce that I will not run for re-election to the United States Senate."

The Orlando Republican was expected to face a tough re-election, but he said that had nothing to do with his decision, he said, noting that he has faced much tougher odds in his public and private life. He is the only Republican Hispanic in the U.S. Senate, and his departure will leave a big hole in Hispanic Republican leadership in Washington.

 

Martinez's departure immediately set off speculation about potential successors, including whether Democratic Chief Financial Officer Alex Sink will reconsider her expected announcement that she would not run for the Senate in 2010 and instead seek another term in the Cabinet.

Among the potential Republican candidates: Attorney General Bill McCollum, former state House Speaker Marco Rubio, and U.S. Reps. Adam Putnam and Vern Buchanan. Democratic names include Sink, Orlando Mayor Buddy Dyer, state Sen. Dan Gelber, and U.S. Reps. Ron Klein, Allen Boyd and Kendrick Meek.

The transcript of Martinez's remarks today:

“If there is one thing I have learned over the years, it is that life can have many wonderful detours from where you think you’re going. These result from chance, adversity and a call to duty.

“As a teenager growing up in Cuba, I saw comfort and the rule of law replaced by tyranny and communist oppression. I saw people beaten for practicing their faith. I remember those who spoke out vanishing –- never to be seen again. My parents, with the help of the Catholic Church, sent me here, to the United States -– a place to be safe until we could be reunited.

“It was here that I learned the greatness of this country –- and the genuine goodness of the American people. I lived with two foster families -– good, decent, loving people who answered a call from the pulpit one Sunday to take in a boy they did not know, from a country they had never seen, who spoke a language they did not understand. 

“I thank God for the Young and Berkmeyer families. They helped me understand what it means to be American –- what it is to aspire to live the American dream -– and the profound virtue of giving back to your community.

“After four years I was reunited with my family. I went to college and law school. I met the woman who would become my best friend, my partner and counsel. Kitty and I settled in Orlando -– my only true home after I left Cuba. We started a family, sent our two older children, Lauren and John, to Bishop Moore High School -– the same school I attended –- and where our younger son, Andrew, started as a freshman this year. Orlando is where I built a law practice, and where I was encouraged to become an active member of this vibrant and growing community.

“After years of involvement in numerous community organizations and boards and with encouragement from many friends, I threw my hat into the political ring, running for Orange County Mayor. 

“What an honor it would be,” I thought, “to serve as mayor of the community that took me in.” It was a race where I started in last place. Pundits openly wondered whether a Hispanic could be elected Orange County Mayor at a time when only 5 percent of the registered voters in our county were Hispanic.

“So in November of 1998 I began my term believing that after four -– or maybe eight years at most –- I would return to the private sector. Neither my family nor I had planned or hoped for anything different.

“You all know that one thing led to another. From mayor, I went to serve in the president’s Cabinet. From there, I made the run for U.S. Senate. Again, I started in last place, ran against an impressive field of candidates who had the resources and statewide recognition that should have ended my run early on. Those who volunteered with me knew the odds were against us; no other office holder had been elected on their first statewide run. 

“But we persevered. We proved the American Dream is alive and well, especially when an immigrant arriving here with nothing can one day be elected to serve in the United States Senate.

“The Senate is the only federal office carrying a six-year term, so a decision about whether to run for re-election is one that my family and I have carefully considered over the past year. It was a question that came to mind as I wrote my book -– causing me to reflect on the path I’ve chosen, and to think about, with love and gratitude, those who’ve traveled with me. 

“The inescapable truth, for me, is that the call to public service is strong, but the call to home, family and lifelong friends is even stronger.

“So today, with deep love for this country and with sincere gratitude to the people who placed their trust in me, I announce that I will not run for re-election to the United States Senate.

“I thank all of those who helped me reach the highest elected office that an immigrant can hold in this great country. And I especially thank my family, who has supported me every step of the way -– especially Kitty, who has sacrificed much more than me and without whom none of this would have been possible. 

“Some might try to characterize this decision in terms of political affairs. Some will say a re-election campaign would have been too difficult. But I’ve faced much tougher odds in political campaigns and in life. My decision was not based on re-election prospects, but on what I want to do with the next eight years of my life.

“The thought of devoting more time to my roles as husband, dad, granddad, brother and son to the family I love and cherish, and to be 'Mel' to the friends I miss –- makes this decision far easier than one might think.

“So with two years left in my term, I make this announcement today in order to give the many qualified individuals who might choose to try to succeed me an opportunity to organize and gather support.

“I look forward to serving out these next two years. There are big problems facing Florida and the nation, and I will continue to do what I think is in the best interests of the people whom I represent.

“Thank you; God bless you; and God Bless the United States of America.”

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[Last modified: Tuesday, September 14, 2010 5:49pm]

    

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