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From the staff of the Tampa Bay Times

Florida Legislature's leadership for 2016-18 includes major Miami-Dade influence

Sens. René García, R-Hialeah, and Anitere Flores, R-Miami, talk on the floor of the Florida Senate in March. In the upcoming 2017 session, Flores will be president pro tempore, the chamber’s No. 2 in command under incoming President Joe Negron, R-Stuart.

Scott Keeler / Tampa Bay Times

Sens. René García, R-Hialeah, and Anitere Flores, R-Miami, talk on the floor of the Florida Senate in March. In the upcoming 2017 session, Flores will be president pro tempore, the chamber’s No. 2 in command under incoming President Joe Negron, R-Stuart.

21

November

For the next two years and potentially beyond, lawmakers representing Miami-Dade County are poised to wield extreme influence in the Florida Legislature — the likes of which they haven’t had in a decade or more.

At least seven Miami-Dade legislators — and potentially a few more yet to be announced — will hold powerful leadership positions from now through 2018 under incoming Senate President Joe Negron, R-Stuart, and House Speaker Richard Corcoran, R-Land O’Lakes.

These roles should ensure Miami-Dade’s mark on everything from school choice measures and gambling regulations to which local projects get funding priority.

The 2016-18 Legislature will be sworn in Tuesday during a one-day organizational session, when Negron and Corcoran will also formally take over as chamber leaders.

Both the new Senate president and House speaker have chosen Republican women from Miami as their top lieutenants: Sen. Anitere Flores and Rep. Jeanette Nuñez, respectively.

Below them will be a slew of committee chairs from Miami-Dade, too, who will have the ability — particularly in the House — to hold sway over statewide policy and the purse strings of the state’s $82 billion budget.

Among those chairs is Miami Lakes Republican Rep. Jose Oliva, who Corcoran named leader of the powerful House Rules and Policy Committee. Oliva is also what his Miami colleagues call the “speaker in waiting,” poised to succeed Corcoran as head of the chamber two years from now.

For local residents, these positions of influence for Miami-Dade legislators mean the senators and representatives they elected — especially the Republican ones, since that party holds the majority in both chambers — will be among the key decision-makers in Tallahassee with the ability to put the county’s needs and priorities at the forefront for possibly years to come.

“It’s access to where decisions get made,” Nuñez said. “We really are in a unique position and our citizens are the better for it.”

More here.

[Last modified: Monday, November 21, 2016 10:17am]

    

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