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From the staff of the Tampa Bay Times

Legislative candidates who don't live in district they're seeking can't vote for themselves

State Sen. Anitere Flores, R-Miami, is one of seven legislative candidates in Miami-Dade who currently doesn’t live in and isn’t registered to vote in the district she’s running to represent. Flores lives in Senate District 40 but is running in District 39.

Steve Cannon / AP

State Sen. Anitere Flores, R-Miami, is one of seven legislative candidates in Miami-Dade who currently doesn’t live in and isn’t registered to vote in the district she’s running to represent. Flores lives in Senate District 40 but is running in District 39.

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November

When she votes this fall, veteran Miami Republican lawmaker Anitere Flores might not be able to vote for herself.

Because if she votes in her current precinct, the ballot she receives will have neither her name nor her District 39 Florida Senate race on it. It will list the District 40 race instead.

The same goes for House District 103 candidate Ivette Gonzalez Petkovich, a Doral Democrat in her first bid for public office. Rather than seeing her own name on a ballot for the first time, she’ll see candidates for House District 116 if she votes in the precinct she’s assigned to now.

That’s because Flores and Gonzalez Petkovich — along with five other legislative candidates in Miami-Dade — don’t currently live in and aren’t registered to vote in the district that they’re seeking to represent.

The Herald/Times identified the seven candidates — one Republican (Flores) and six Democrats — through an analysis of current voter registration records. These candidates make up 20 percent of the 34 candidates competing for Miami-Dade legislative seats this fall.

More here.

[Last modified: Thursday, November 3, 2016 8:57am]

    

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