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From the staff of the Tampa Bay Times

Tim Kaine, Robby Mook wake up Florida Democrats

 Sen. Tim Kaine, the Democratic vice presidential candidate, during a sound check and walk through at the Wells Fargo Center on the third day of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia.

Sam Hodgson | New York Times

Sen. Tim Kaine, the Democratic vice presidential candidate, during a sound check and walk through at the Wells Fargo Center on the third day of the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia.

27

July

PHILADELPHIA —  Florida Democratic convention delegates were straggling into to the Marriott ballroom for breakfast Wednesday morning, when vice presidential nominee Tim Kaine slipped into the room with his wife, Anne. A lot of delegates hadn't even arrived yet, but those who had were thrilled.

"This election is about whether we're going to build a community of inclusion and respect, that beloved community that Dr. King talked about. Or whether it's going to be okay to trash somebody if they're disabled, to make fun of someone if they're Mexican American or Latinos, whether they're a new immigrant, or a Latina governor or a federal judge, to Donald Trump everybody's second class," Kaine said. "We don't believe in second class. We believe everybody's first class, and that's what this election is all about."

He recounted his pre-politics background working in Honduras and as a civil rights advocate.

"I thought I was going to do that my whole life. But then I got mad at my city council. That was eight races and 22 years ago. I'm 8 and 0 folks, 8 and 0. Let me be candid, I've never won by much. But let me give you some career advice: If if you're barely likeable enough, politics is a good profession."

Clinton campaign manager Robby Mook made a surprise appearance next, talking up the need to elect Democrats up and down the ticket.

"We're not running the Hillary Clinton campaign in Florida, we're running the coordinated campaign in Florida. We have hundreds of staffers, dozens of offices open," he said. "President Obama won Florida by less than 1 percent. It's going to be close and we're going to win it on the ground by turning people out."

 

 

 

 

[Last modified: Wednesday, July 27, 2016 11:54am]

    

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