Clear66° FULL FORECASTClear66° FULL FORECAST
Make us your home page
Instagram

Tom Jones' 2 cents

Tom Jones has his opinions.

Shooting from the lip

Looking back at a weekend of televised sports ...

danielson.Best coverage
Saturday's Florida-Georgia game wasn't the best-played college football game ever. Actually, it was a dog with both teams playing sloppily.

But CBS's broadcast was superb. Leading that charge was analyst Gary Danielson, who had his best day of the season. Danielson's analysis was spot-on all day, and he was excellent in his anticipation.

His finest moment: In the first quarter, Danielson noticed how a Georgia defensive end crashed toward the running back on a quarterback option play. Danielson pointed out that Gators QB Jeff Driskel could have had a big run if he had held on to the ball and to look for that play later in the game.

Sure enough, in the fourth quarter, Driskel held the ball, that same end crashed the middle, and the quarterback raced for a 20-yard run.

Danielson also had the best line of the weekend. When talking about whether or not a play should be reversed on a video replay, Danielson talked about the different philosophies of replay officials: "Sometimes,'' Danielson said, "they won't overturn anything unless it's obvious to 10 guys in a bar.'' …

Full Story

Wednesday: Chat with Tom Jones, 12:30

Full Story

Shooting from the lip/Oct. 22nd edition

Looking back at a weekend of televised sports ...

buck.Best announcer
NBC's Al Michaels remains the best play-by-play announcer in the country, but Fox's Joe Buck is the most prominent. Michaels mostly does one thing: Sunday Night Football. But Buck has become not only the second-best NFL announcer, behind Michaels, but the best national play-by-play voice for baseball.

Here's how you know an announcer is at the top of his game: When you hear him, you immediately know you're watching a big event. When you hear Buck, you know that game is key, whether it's baseball or football.

Fox took criticism last week by giving Buck double duty on the same day. He called the Giants-49ers football game Sunday afternoon, then rushed across San Francisco to call the Cardinals-Giants National League Championship Series game that night. Sure, it was partly a publicity stunt, but that's fine. I wanted to hear Buck calling both games.

The cool thing is Buck was humble about it. "It's not like I was in the pentathlon,'' he told Sports Illustrated. "I just sat there and talked. It's cute for Fox, but beyond that, people just want to watch the game.''

Well said -- just like everything he says. …

Full Story

Shooting from the lip/Oct. 15th edition

Looking back at a weekend of televised sports ...

junior.Most ill-advised comment, Part I
NASCAR driver Dale Earnhardt Jr. sought medical help for a concussion last week, and that led to him being shut down for two races. Then driver Jeff Gordon said he hated to admit it but he probably would keep quiet if he had concussion symptoms so he could keep driving.

I suppose Gordon should be given credit for his honesty, and he's probably not the only driver who feels that way. However, Gordon needed to keep his mouth shut on this topic. Though he likely didn't intend to question Earnhardt or suggest drivers should keep injuries quiet, that's the way he came off. Earnhardt should be praised, especially because his concussion issues affect his fellow drivers as well. If I was a driver, I'd be a little nervous driving 180 mph next to Gordon, knowing he would go out there even when he didn't feel well. …

Full Story

Shooting from the lip/Oct. 8th edition

Looking back at a weekend of televised sports ...

valentine.Worst idea
A year ago, Terry Francona was fired as manager of the Red Sox and ESPN analyst Bobby Valentine was hired to replace him. That left an opening in the ESPN booth, and it was filled by none other than Francona.

Well, now that Valentine has been fired by the Red Sox and Francona hired by the Indians, you might think Valentine can just slide back into his role at ESPN.

That would be a mistake by ESPN.

Valentine's embarrassing tenure with the Red Sox shot a major hole in his credibility with baseball fans. The hole is so big that fans likely wouldn’t believe much of what he said on television.

Look, Valentine knows baseball and can communicate with an audience. But his season in Boston was way more than just a losing one. It was a train wreck. He criticized players, fought with the media and even threw his coaching staff under the bus, suggesting it undermined him.
Most of all, Valentine came off as unlikable. …

Full Story