How do Tampa Bay worker wages compare with the national average?

homedepotworkersptimes.jpgWake up and good morningAverage pay for civilian workers in the Tampa Bay area was 7 percent below the national average in 2010, one of 77 metropolitan areas studied by the national compensation survey, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics reports. I suppose that Tampa Bay wages paying 93 percent (that's 93 cents on the $1) of the national average is bearable. Florida wages have always tended to hover below average.

The good news is that the Great Recession has not dragged wages down further (though that remains to be seen in subsequent surveys). The bad news is Tampa Bay is making little headway in its quest to raise area wages with "better" jobs. That quest, too, may be premature to judge but it sure will take a long time to boost the overall "93 percent" wage here.

Here's the breakdown from BLS (full details here) on what types of industries are paying what level of wages compared to the national average (equaling 100 percent) for each industry. So, for every $1 paid on average nationwide, here's how much you'd earn on average in Tampa Bay:

* Management, business and financial: 95 cents.

* Profession and related: 88 cents.

* Service: 96 cents.

* Sales and related: 92 cents.

* Office, administrative support: 96 cents.

* Construction and extraction: 93 cents.

* Installation, maintenance and repair: 90 cents.

* Production: 89 cents.

* Transportation and material moving: 93 cents.

And how do average Tampa Bay wages compare with those of other metro areas in Florida and the southeast? If Tampa Bay workers earn an overall 93 percent of the national pay average, here's how some other metro areas fared:

* Orlando: 91 percent.

* Miami-Fort Lauderdale: 97 percent.

* Ocala: 87 percent.

* Tallahassee: 88 percent.

* Dallas, Texas: 98 percent.

* Charlotte, NC: 99 percent.

* Atlanta: 98 percent.

(Photo: St. Petersburg Times.)

-- Robert Trigaux, Business Columnist, St. Petersburg Times

[Last modified: Tuesday, May 31, 2011 8:05am]

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