Friday, October 19, 2018
Books

Review: Family secrets on menu in Herman Koch's The Dinner

It's just dinner at a high-end Amsterdam restaurant: two brothers, their wives, a little wine, a little talk. What could happen? By the last page of The Dinner, Herman Koch's suspenseful and sometimes disturbing novel, the better question is: What didn't?

The hook is set early when the narrator, Paul Lohman, wonders how the evening would have turned out if he had not ventured into his son's room before dinner and seen something on the boy's cellphone. "Would the smell of happiness I inhaled from my wife's hair still have smelled only like happiness, and not, as it did now, like some distant memory — like the smell of something you could lose just like that?"

At the restaurant, Paul and Claire meet Paul's brother, Serge, a prominent politician in line for the prime ministership, and his wife, Babette. The two couples each have a son aged 15; Serge and Babette also have a younger daughter and an adopted teenage son, Beau, from Africa.

The four have gathered to talk about the boys, but at the outset no one is sure what anyone else knows about what has happened. Behind Babette's tinted glasses it looks like she's been crying.

What has happened? Of that, the less said the better. Readers are advised to avert their eyes from dust jacket summaries, online reviews and other potential spoiler sources. Much of the pleasure in this novel derives from Koch's skill with structure and suspense, which leads readers to eagerly unpeel the onion of this family, layer by layer, all the way to the (rotten? happy?) core. It's enough to say that it's no accident the films Straw Dogs and Deliverance make an appearance in the text.

Through the course of the meal, Paul critiques the restaurant's rigmarole. The manager points with his pinkie while describing the ingredients and their origins. Paul can't stand his brother's sniffling and gargling of wine. He's appalled by the vast foodless spaces on their plates. The dainty, ritualized atmosphere forms a stark contrast to the anger bubbling beneath the surface.

The novel, translated from the Dutch by Sam Garrett, covers a lot of ground between aperitif and digestif: racism, homelessness, capital punishment, genetics.

Down at the human level, Koch puts a powerful microscope on the workings of a family in crisis. But after all the words spilled across the dinner table, it may be what isn't said that allows people to carry on. As Paul finds, "Secrets didn't get in the way of happiness."

Mike Fasso is a Times staff writer.

Comments
David Small’s ‘Home After Dark’ a powerful graphic novel about adolescence

David Small’s ‘Home After Dark’ a powerful graphic novel about adolescence

Although it’s set in the 1960s, the book’s story of a young teen’s struggle with bullying and homelessness is as urgent as ever.
Published: 10/15/18
Updated: 10/17/18
Jeff Klinkenberg is reading Lauren Groff, Tara Westover and Gary Shteyngart

Jeff Klinkenberg is reading Lauren Groff, Tara Westover and Gary Shteyngart

Former Times Real Florida columnist Jeff Klinkenberg is enjoying fiction and memoir by women writers and looking forward to meeting novelist Gary Shteyngart at the Times Festival of Reading.
Published: 10/12/18
Review: G. Neri’s ‘Grand Theft Horse’ a thrilling true tale of a woman on a mission

Review: G. Neri’s ‘Grand Theft Horse’ a thrilling true tale of a woman on a mission

The real-life main character of "Grand Theft Horse," a new graphic biography for middle-grade readers, gave up almost everything to rescue a racehorse she trained.
Published: 10/05/18
Gernhard biographer Bill DeYoung finds little new in Petty bio

Gernhard biographer Bill DeYoung finds little new in Petty bio

Bill DeYoungDeYoung is the author of Phil Gernhard, Record Man, a biography of a record producer with ties to St. Petersburg whose hits included Stay and Snoopy vs. the Red Baron. When we caught up with him recently, DeYoung explained his interest ca...
Published: 10/05/18
Review: Grief turns into danger in Lisa Unger’s thriller ‘Under My Skin’

Review: Grief turns into danger in Lisa Unger’s thriller ‘Under My Skin’

Grief is sometimes akin to madness. The loss of a loved one can knock our world off its rails for a while, until we find a new way to live. But for Poppy Lang, a young widow still struggling a year after the unsolved murder of her husband, sanity see...
Updated one month ago
Review: Robert Olen Butler’s Paris in the Dark packed with action

Review: Robert Olen Butler’s Paris in the Dark packed with action

On a fall night in 1915, an American reporter sips Chartreuse at a sidewalk table as German Zeppelins patrol the perimeter of Paris. As he plans how to finagle his way to the front lines of World War I, a bomb explodes at another cafe nearby, and he ...
Updated one month ago
Novelist, USF professor Karen Brown drawn by the voices of stories of loss

Novelist, USF professor Karen Brown drawn by the voices of stories of loss

Karen BrownBrown teaches creative writing at the University of South Florida and is the author of several books, including The Longing of Wayward Girls and the short story collection Pins and Needles. On Nov. 17, Brown will be a featured author at th...
Updated one month ago