Sunday, June 24, 2018
Books

What's William Felice reading?

Nightstand

William Felice

In his newest book, The Ethics of Interdependence: Global Human Rights and Duties, Felice takes on the question, "Why should we be concerned about what's going on abroad when there's suffering here at home?" His answer involves four case studies, including gay rights in Africa, women's rights in Saudi Arabia, environmental rights in China and mass incarceration in the United States. "There are many examples of this type of ethical interdependence and how actions in one country negatively impact human rights in another country,'' he explained. Felice, 66, is a professor of international relations and global affairs at Eckerd College. He stressed that as an educator, his aim is to "not create a political person'' but instead to teach students how to "take on responsibility themselves and to be an informed citizen in our democracy."

On Sept. 22, Felice and Tampa Bay Times book editor Colette Bancroft will discuss The Ethics of Interdependence at Eckerd College. Felice will be a featured author at the Times Festival of Reading on Nov. 12.

What's on your nightstand?

The first is East West Street: On the Origins of Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity by Philippe Sands. It's a biography of two remarkable individuals, Raphael Lemkin and Hersch Lauterpacht. Lemkin created the concept of genocide and Lauterpacht created the concept of crimes against humanity. It traces how their lives became intertwined, ending at the tribunal against Nazi leadership. It was really good.

And this was personal reading, not for class?

Yes. And I also have Colson Whitehead's The Underground Railroad. It's a story of a young slave that makes a desperate bid for freedom. I also have Heroes of the Frontier by Dave Eggers. This is lighter reading. I'm a Dave Eggers groupie. He's a great writer. It's a dark comedy.

What was the first book of Eggers' you read?

What Is the What. It is about the Lost Boys of Sudan. He writes about a boy named Valentino (Achak Deng) who immigrates to the U.S. Eggers traces the journey.

Did anything he do influence your teaching?

Definitely. I try to bring in both novels and biographies that can tell a story about a part of the world. Just reading facts is not enough. One of the key things for teaching international relations is to help students empathize, to put themselves in the shoes of someone else. Dave Eggers did that with What Is the What, in helping us understand the genocide at a deeper level from just facts and figures. I also assign Orhan Pamuk, the Turkish writer. His book Snow can help students empathize.

Any other books for students that help them become more aware of or sensitive to world issues?

I recommend The Sympathizer by Viet Thanh Nguyen. It's a powerful examination of Vietnam. It is about this man who is a communist agent who ends up in California. His narrative really helps students understand the complexity of Vietnam.

Contact Piper Castillo at [email protected] Follow @Florida_PBJC.

Comments
Review: Look inside the tent of a Gibsonton-based sideshow in Tessa Fontaine’s memoir ‘The Electric Woman’

Review: Look inside the tent of a Gibsonton-based sideshow in Tessa Fontaine’s memoir ‘The Electric Woman’

Grief can unhinge us, disconnect us from our daily lives, make us do things we’ve never done. Grief made Tessa Fontaine run away and join the circus.To be more exact, the sideshow: World of Wonders, the last traditional traveling sideshow in the coun...
Published: 06/21/18
5 fiction writers who've turned their attention to Donald Trump

5 fiction writers who've turned their attention to Donald Trump

He might not have intended it, but Donald Trump has been good for book publishing.
Published: 06/15/18
What’s Neal Thompson, author of ‘Kickflip Boys,’ reading?

What’s Neal Thompson, author of ‘Kickflip Boys,’ reading?

Neal ThompsonFor Father’s Day, we checked in with Neal Thompson from his Seattle office. In his new book, Kickflip Boys, Thompson weaves together a story on raising his two independent, passionate sons while giving us an honest look at the underbelly...
Published: 06/15/18
What is Jen Waite, author of the memoir

What is Jen Waite, author of the memoir "A Beautiful, Terrible Thing," reading?

Jen Waite It is June. Romance and weddings are in the air, and with that comes the paperback release of A Beautiful, Terrible Thing: A Memoir of Marriage and Betrayal by Jen Waite, 33. The book, based on Waite’s heartbreaking wedding story, fi...
Updated one month ago
Review: Jake Tapper’s ‘Hellfire Club’ a fictional thriller sharpened with real 1950s politics

Review: Jake Tapper’s ‘Hellfire Club’ a fictional thriller sharpened with real 1950s politics

Washington, D.C., is a city in crisis, the operations of the federal government all but paralyzed by the conspiracy theories of a powerful politician who behaves as if the bounds of protocol and decency don’t apply to him. As he distracts the nation,...
Updated one month ago
What’s Helen Rappaport reading?

What’s Helen Rappaport reading?

Helen RappaportWhile delving into archives and researching her new book about the murder of the Russian imperial family 100 years ago, The Race to Save the Romanovs, Rappaport celebrated the digital age. "I am able to go back so far in time and look ...
Updated one month ago
Review: Lauren Groff’s ‘Florida’ explores a state beyond the boundaries

Review: Lauren Groff’s ‘Florida’ explores a state beyond the boundaries

In "Flower Hunters," one of the stories in Lauren Groff’s stunning new book Florida, a character gets a reader’s crush on 18th century explorer William Bartram, an early chronicler of the state’s flora and fauna: "She’s most d...
Updated one month ago