feeling fine

New sunscreen products incorporate moisturizers, makeup, antiaging components

Tampa Bay Rays manager Joe Maddon sprays sunblock on his face before a game.

CHRIS ZUPPA | Times (2011)

Tampa Bay Rays manager Joe Maddon sprays sunblock on his face before a game.

The sunscreen market is crowded with lotions and sprays, powders and lip balms, and, increasingly, multitasking products with inventive application methods that are touted for their ability to do more than just block the UVA and UVB rays that lead to sunburns, skin cancer and premature aging of the skin.

Indeed, many of the season's new sun care products were designed to marry broad-spectrum sun protection with anti-aging compounds, moisturizers, makeup — even self tanners.

"The world of sun care has changed. It used to be enough that you just had an SPF product. You were going to the beach or pool and you knew you needed sun protection. But sun damage happens every day, so we're looking for more out of our formulas," said Holly Thaggard. She is owner and founder of Supergoop in San Antonio, Texas, a maker of broad-spectrum sunscreens that incorporate antiaging compounds in formulas that are free of parabens, fragrance, oxybenzone and other chemicals common to mass-market brands.

Earlier this month, Supergoop (sold at Sephora, Nordstrom, Macy's and other retailers) introduced a broad-spectrum 20 SPF sunscreen and self tanner that works gradually and doesn't rub off on clothes or towels. In February, the company also introduced a lightweight 30 SPF serum for the face that absorbs quickly and doesn't look or feel greasy.

"The whole idea is to get away from the lifeguard, white-nose look. Everyone wants it very transparent," said Chris Birchby, founder of COOLA, an Oceanside, Calif., company that makes certified organic, chemical-free, broad-spectrum sunscreens. Among COOLA's offerings is a matte-finish tinted sunscreen for the face that is incredibly lightweight.

COOLA products are made with zinc and titanium, which work by reflecting sunlight, but the particles are encapsulated and coated to make them disperse more equally and, therefore, more transparently, said Birchby.

If the best sunscreen is the sunscreen people will use, multitasking products that are easy to apply and fold into busy lives may offer a solution.

"I have three kids and a hairy husband, and getting lotion on them is a major hassle," said Valerie McMurray, founder of Soleil Organique, in Bronxville, N.Y., which this year launched a broad-spectrum 45 SPF sunblock mist that also includes antiaging ingredients such as red algae and the anti-inflammatory Bisabolol. She chose a mister instead of an aerosol spray because it lessens the inhalation risk, she said, and is easier for the user to know the skin is adequately covered because it needs to be rubbed in.

THE MOST COMMON FORM OF CANCER

Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer in the United States, with the incidence of its most deadly form, melanoma, increasing 2.3 percent for men and 2.5 percent for women annually.

Most of us don't use enough protection. A shot glass full of sunscreen should be applied to exposed skin every day, according to the American Academy of Dermatology, but most people apply just 25 percent to 50 percent of the recommended amount.

The academy recommends sunscreens with an SPF of 30 that protects against both UVA and UVB rays.

• Natural sunscreens use two active ingredients: titanium dioxide and zinc oxide, the latter of which can temporarily whiten skin. Both work by physically blocking the sun's rays.

• Traditional sunscreens use chemicals such as oxybenzone and avobenzone to absorb ultraviolet rays and prevent them from causing damage. Avobenzone absorbs UVA; oxybenzone, UVB.

New sunscreen products incorporate moisturizers, makeup, antiaging components 06/29/12 [Last modified: Friday, June 29, 2012 2:44pm]

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