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Features

  1. Amendment 1 aims to save Florida's environmentally sensitive lands

    State Roundup

    More than two decades after Florida identified the need to save disappearing forests south of Miami, shrinking hammocks in the Keys and other sensitive land across the state, environmentalists fed up with politics getting in the way of conservation are taking their fight to the people.

    Backers of the Florida Water and Land Conservation Amendment hope the measure will add to the state’s roster of protected lands such as the Everglades.
  2. After cancer isolates her from the world, teen to get a taste of freedom

    Human Interest

    The bruised face of a teenage girl stares into the camera. This is what passes for a selfie in the life of a quarantined cancer patient with a hospital room for a last known address.

    Ashley Krueger and her parents are planning a journey to New York to see The Phantom of the Opera on Broadway.
  3. Duke Energy plans to help on L.A. wind farm project — but what about Florida?

    Energy

    Duke Energy announced plans Tuesday for the nation's largest wind farm and energy storage system in the western United States, prompting questions about whether the utility should offer major clean energy projects in Florida and the East Coast.

    This wind farm sits on a bluff above Wallula in southern Washington state near the Columbia River. Could a wind project be in Florida's future? [Steve Ringman/Seattle Times/MCT]
  4. Rock star promoter has music industry stories to share

    Life Times

    When you're a young boy growing up in Manchester, England, it's tough not to dream of one day becoming a world-class soccer player.

    Tony Michaelides is a British record promoter, now living in Pass-a-Grille, who has worked with some of the biggest names in music.
  5. 43 times a minute, 'sound of progress' just makes people furious (w/video)

    Human Interest

    ST. PETERSBURG

    It started on a Tuesday, April 29, 7:01 a.m., while kids were eating Cheerios and professors were starting to shower and retirees were trying to sleep in.

    Ear-piercing pile driving at the new apartment building next to the downtown St. Petersburg Publix began in April and continues.
  6. In campus rape cases, victim often blamed for failure to prosecute

    College

    TAMPA — Since 2007, only one of 19 rape cases involving students investigated by the University of South Florida police has faced prosecution.

    Georgia Cappleman is the chief assistant state attorney for Tallahassee.
  7. 1957 Pillsbury Bake-Off finalist had picture taken with Ronald Reagan

    Human Interest

    The first time 87-year-old Lorraine Edie saw color television, she was on it.

    Lorraine Edie wears the Pillsbury apron given to her in 1957 when she was the only finalist from New York.
  8. Even with in-network hospital, insurance may not cover ER physicians

    Health

    When her husband, Charles, showed signs of heart trouble in January, Donna Baker didn't hesitate to drive him to the emergency department at nearby Mease Countryside Hospital.

    Michele and Michael Coe had insurance coverage for a trip to Bayfront Health Brooksville’s emergency room in October. Then they received a bill of almost $1,000 for the doctor,  who wasn’t in  their network.
  9. In southwest Florida, man and panther vie over goats and state's true nature

    Wildlife

    NAPLES — Arturo Freyre lives among the lions.

    Mark Lotz a Panther Biologist for the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission helps Arturo Freyre remove the carcasses of several goats that were killed by panthers. This was the second attack that occurred on this property over the course of three days, claiming a total of four goats and one chicken.  Large panther prints and fur where found in and around the enclosures where the animals were being kept. Lotz spent several hours on the property collecting fur samples, securing pens and enclosures, and making sure the owner felt comfortable and safe.  Manuel Martinez   |   Naples Daily News (2010)
  10. Verhulst column: The lock on our lives

    Perspective

    I've been thinking about my combination lock a lot. I keep it on a locker at work. Twenty or more times a week I spin the dial right, then left, then right, and the lock drops open with a satisfying "chunk." The first time I used that lock — in junior high gym class — we were still sending men to the …

    Only one of these two objects is already obsolete. Hint: It’s not the shiny one. I wasn’t quite a teenager when I got the lock. I got this iPhone after I had turned 55. Its days are numbered.
  11. Taking children to the wrong trauma center can be a deadly mistake

    Health

    One April evening two years ago, 9-year-old Justin Davis dashed into a busy Jacksonville street, headed to a convenience store for snacks.

    Pasco County Driver Engineer/EMT with Engine 14 Wilfred Cardona gives the command to lift a trauma patient involved in a car accident in New Port Richey.
  12. Aunt Mary joins the Greek gods for eternity

    Human Interest

    “Do you prefer a cliff, or water?" asked the owner of the lovely hotel at the foot of Mount Olympus.

  13. The raccoon and the U-turn — a back-road Florida fable (w/video)

    Human Interest

    The road to Pahokee is long and lonely: 38 miles around the southeast shore of Lake Okeechobee. During most of the drive, you can't see the state's largest lake. Just a towering cement wall, rimmed by old fish camps. And on the other side, endless acres of palmettos. You often go for miles without seeing a soul.

    MELISSA LYTTLE / Times
  14. From typing to HTML, teaching the tech revolution

    Human Interest

    ST. PETERSBURG — In the back building at St. Pete High, in a third-floor corner classroom, Mrs. Mathis stood waiting to greet her students on her last first day of school.

    1974 Lakewood High School yearbook
  15. For sailboat designer Charley Morgan, life's still a breeze

    Human Interest

    Charley Morgan, who calls himself "the ancient mariner," felt like a kid again. Eighty-five candles will grace his next birthday cake, but when he noticed the palm trees swaying beyond the window, he marched outside to look at Boca Ciega Bay. Standing on his dock, he saw Blue Cloud prancing at the end of a rope like a …

    A self-portrait of Charley Morgan, who took up painting after his first wife died of cancer in 2001.
  16. Perspective: New Russian flag looks familiar

    Perspective

    NBC reports that a single "New Russia" flag is "slowly replacing" the individual flags of various pro-Russian Ukrainian separatist groups. The flag of New Russia, or Novorossiya, has been around for a few months. And it looks a lot like another flag that you may associate with armed rebellion. The Moscow Times

    The New Russia (Novorossiya) flag flies next to the Lenin statue in Donetsk, eastern Ukraine, this summer.
  17. Impressed by his grit, readers offer help to USF student

    Human Interest

    TAMPA — Dakota Rockwell never asked for help. He was reluctant to share all his hardships.

    After Dakota Rockwell spoke at a University of South Florida banquet for new business students, and the Times ran a story about him Monday,  hundreds of strangers reached out, applauding his perseverance, wanting to ease his difficult journey. [MELISSA LYTTLE   |   Times
]
  18. Seven weeks in a Honduran prison: The untold story of the 'Aqua Quest'

    Human Interest

    [ CAMERON COTTRILL | Times ]
  19. Cut short by Gov. Rick Scott, climate scientist finishes his thought

    Human Interest

    David Hastings of Eckerd College in St. Petersburg recently traveled to Tallahassee to talk to Rick Scott about how to save Florida.

    Eckerd College marine science professor David Hastings, left, speaks to Gov. Rick Scott about climate change.
  20. Ideas don't fall from trees — you've got to climb for them

    Human Interest

    The magazine in your hand begins in a casual morning meeting held many days, even weeks ago. In a room that looks west over a crumbling YMCA and south toward a rising apartment complex, writers, photographers and editors share what's on their minds. It's an idea factory, but it's more like the place where hurricanes are …