Make us your home page

Good Reads

  1. Friends finish odyssey to make sure UF remembers a Vietnam War hero

    Human Interest

    GAINESVILLE — The old men met after sun up Saturday in the parking lot of an abandoned Mexican restaurant on the south side of town. They shook hands and hugged and climbed aboard a bus, careful not to fall.

    Capt. William Edward Taylor speaks to his men in Vietnam in 1966. Taylor was killed in August of that year and was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross posthumously. [Picasa]
  2. Fate works its magic in reuniting two orphaned sisters from South Korea

    Human Interest

    SARASOTA — When the police pulled 5-year-old Pok-nam Shin out of school, the little girl who now goes by Holly Hoyle O'Brien asked the only question that mattered: Where's my daddy?

    Visa photos of half-sisters Holly Hoyle O’Brien , left, and Meagan Hughes for their adoptions out of a South Korean orphanage to two American families.
  3. Take the True Florida Quiz: Can you spot the bogus Florida headline?


    You're reading this, which means you know Florida, which means you know Florida has a legendary case of the crazies. As with all good legends, over time, it can be tough to sort the myths from the truth.

    The True Florida Quiz is here to help.

    Josie Hollingsworth | TIMES
  4. Homosassa woman feels the sway of her native Cuba

    Human Interest

    Ingrid Ricci's view of Cuba is a complex one, formed during three different periods over more than half a century.

    Ingrid Ricci, left, and her cousin Ermalita Alameda pass a government building with Fidel Castro's image while touring the streets by foot in Santiago de Cuba. [Photo by Amber Sigman]
  5. Drones and dogs save suicidal avocados from the dreaded redbay ambrosia beetle



    Foreign invaders are decimating Florida avocados.

    A drone flies over the 20-acre avocado grove in Redland on Oct. 14 that belongs to Art Ballard.
  6. Perspective: Do polls have problems?


    In the Republican presidential nomination contest, the polls have been the outsiders' best friend. Billionaire Donald Trump and physician Ben Carson gained early momentum and critical debate exposure thanks almost entirely to their consistently high rankings in any number of public opinion surveys.

    Sen. Bernie Sanders, of Vermont, speaks during the CNN Democratic presidential debate Tuesday, Oct. 13, 2015, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)
  7. As dementia symptoms increase, doctor living with Alzheimer's knows exactly what his future holds

    Human Interest

    UPDATE: In the days since this story was published, readers have responded to the portrayal of Dr. David Kramer by sharing the struggles their afflicted family members face. They also commented on the difficulty for society and the plan Dr. Kramer has for the end stage of his disease:

     David and Tiffany Kramer during their routine walk on the beach in Naples Thursday, Sept. 10, 2015.   Dr. David Kramer was an incredibly bright emergency room physician in Pennsylvania when he started to notice his memory fading. It was getting harder to remember patients' names and follow along with stories his kids told. He had to work harder at preparing for lectures; he kept asking his wife if familiar dresses were new. After about 5 years of increased struggling, he saw a series of doctors and was diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's at age 56. Now he's 59 and he and his wife live in Naples. Their motto is to live the hell out of life while they still have time. There's no definite time period before the disease gets worse, so they're trying to live every day to the fullest. On the 25th of August, I'm going to spend some time with them to get a sense of their average day in Naples, including sitting in on a session of the Early Onset Alzheimer's group meeting at the Alzheimer's Support Network there.
  8. Sun City Center couple's dance of life now moves to different rhythm

    Human Interest

    In a small room at Palm Garden nursing home in Sun City Center, two souls draw closer.

    John Breslin, a World War II vet, looks at photos from his service on the submarine USS Cavalla. He enlisted in the Naval Reserve at 17, met Rita Hughes, 14, during training in 1943 and wrote her after he went to sea.
  9. Dark places breed Gulfport woman's Halloween haunts

    Human Interest

    "I'm no Mary Poppins," Amy Slone says.

    If Poppins was obsessive-compulsive about a holiday, it would be Christmas. Slone hates Christmas. She has self-diagnosed OHD — Obsessive Halloween Disorder. Months before Halloween, she begins turning her Gulfport home — front to back, top to bottom — into …

    Amy Slone, sufferer of self-diagnosed Obsessive Halloween Disorder, has for the past 10 years built a haunted house at her Gulfport home. This year’s theme: post-nuclear apocalypse clown terror.
  10. St. Petersburg man stayed connected to grandfather through battered old canoe, until it was stolen


    ST. PETERSBURG — In December, Brad Stigleman propped his battered old canoe behind his in-laws' home in Feather Sound, right beside a pond perfect for fishing.

    He thought it'd be safe there.

    Brad Stigleman, 38, of Clearwater, is pictured with his daughter Aubrey in his grandfather's canoe. [Photo courtesy of Brad Stigleman]
  11. Merl Reagle transformed modern culture into puzzle wit

    Human Interest

    Merl Reagle was a breakfast guy.

    Everybody thinks of him as a word guy, which he certainly was, but the word was coffee. Decaf. Merl didn't require artificial stimulants. His mind worked, near as I could tell, with the relentlessness of a hydroelectric dam. He transformed the torrent of modern culture into …

  12. Two empty-nesters quit their jobs, sell their house and take to the sea

    Human Interest

    The ceilings were low. The carpet, yellow shag. The windows were outdated. But the house opened out to the water, and that was all that mattered.

    The Sea Gypsy has been home for former Tampa Bay Times writer Kris Hundley and her husband since they quit their jobs and in January sold the house in which they raised their family for more than 25 years.
  13. A mom ponders her identity as her firstborn leaves for college

    Human Interest

    All year, I watched our son plan his escape.

    CAPTION: (Suwannee River, 07/29/2006) Ryland (cq) tells his mother, Lane DeGregory (cq) a story as they cruise in a houseboat on the Suwannee River.
SUMMARY: Travel feature
(Times photo by Lara Cerri)
  14. Pining for the perfect movie ending


    Movie endings aren't what they used to be.

  15. A family mourns cancellation of 'Sábado Gigante'

    The Feed

    The news jumped out at me from Twitter. I stared for several seconds in disbelief.

    Mario Kreutzberger, aka Don Francisco, center, is the creator and host of  S?bado Gigante, TV’s longest-running variety show. It began in Chile in 1962. It ends Sept. 19.
  16. For one man, owning dogs has created a warm and fuzzy change

    Human Interest

    We went to brunch on Father's Day, me and my parents, who had driven over from West Palm Beach. We'd gone to a nicer restaurant than usual, and my father had let me order oysters even though he thinks they're gross.

    David Gartner plays with dog Daisy, 13, who was adopted for the two Gartner children but has had David as primary caretaker.
  17. A high school junior faces her future without her biggest ally

    Human Interest

    It's so quiet in the van, rain is all we hear on the two-hour drive to Gainesville. My friend has let me tag along with her family to tour the University of Florida. No one is doing much to break the awkward silence.

    "Cheetos?" my friend asks at one point.

    A half-hour passes.

    "We have granola bars, …

    Hillsborough High School junior Annie Aguiar of Tampa, center, tours the University of Florida in July with her best friend, Meghana Bhimreddy, left. Aguiar had planned to tour UF with her grandfather, who was her biggest ally.
  18. When closure is elusive: Fletcher Currin buried 15 years after his death

    Human Interest

    OLIVIA, N.C.

    A worker struggles to lift the steel vault, then position it over a hole in the lawn behind a country church. • Three of us watch as he lowers the remains of Stewart Fletcher Currin, my closest childhood friend, into the ground. • My girlfriend takes my elbow. "Now you have closure," she …

    Stewart Fletcher Currin
  19. For two who teach it, the best Florida literature recognizes the surreal


    Florida literature has a longer history than you may think.

    Spouses Tom Hallock, left, and Julie Buckner Armstrong teach literature at USF St. Petersburg.
  20. Fictional Florida: a look at 80-some writers with state roots, settings


    "Literary" is probably not the first adjective that comes to mind when you think of Florida.

    STEVE MADDEN | Times