Light Rain75° FULL FORECASTLight Rain75° FULL FORECAST
Make us your home page
Instagram

Features

  1. For two who teach it, the best Florida literature recognizes the surreal

    Books

    Florida literature has a longer history than you may think.

    Spouses Tom Hallock, left, and Julie Buckner Armstrong teach literature at USF St. Petersburg.
  2. Fictional Florida: a look at 80-some writers with state roots, settings

    Books

    "Literary" is probably not the first adjective that comes to mind when you think of Florida.

    STEVE MADDEN | Times
  3. Orlando's Crayola Experience a fascinating wonderland of color, technology and nostalgia

    Florida

    ORLANDO

    Fred Rogers' sweater is a hue Crayola might call Forest Green, or maybe Aquamarine, or maybe Illuminating Emerald. He sketches a simple rainbow on an easel in his modest TV living room, the one decorated like childhood, and turns to the camera.

    A “crayonologist” creates a batch of crayons for Crayola Experience visitors.  “This brand has certainly evolved and changed,” Crayola president and CEO Mike Perry (not pictured) says. “But that mission of sparking the creative spirit of a child has never changed.”
  4. Tampa Bay: 'the hottest cult horror movie scene in the country'

    Human Interest

    Call them a creatively incestuous bunch of filmmakers, often working on each other's movies, sometimes helping each other to distribute their macabre artistry. Grisly loves company. Especially in Florida.

    Krista Grotte, who often stars in Tampa Bay movies, teases a killer clown during a break in filming.
  5. For Sale Facebook groups spread online yard sale craze to Tampa Bay

    Retail

    TAMPA — Charlene Cardona used to be addicted, skimming the classified ads for time and place, rising early nearly every Saturday to make someone else's junk her treasure.

    Not anymore.

    Facebook's For Sale groups, unveiled in February, are drawing buyers and sellers from the traditional Saturday morning yard sale.
  6. Wild ride across Florida: 800 miles, alone on a bike

    Human Interest

    Spindly legs dangle from the frame of my glasses. A black body rappels down a silk filament, itsy-bitsy arachnid feet tickling my nose.

    Graham Brink completed an 800-mile bike race across the full length of Florida. [JOHN PENDYGRAFT   |   Times]
  7. Florida's original water parks: the springs

    Human Interest

    ICHETUCKNEE SPRINGS STATE PARK — In the summer of 1539, the conquistador Hernando de Soto and several hundred men lumbered up the Florida peninsula and stopped by this spring-fed river to rest.

    Ichetucknee Springs State Park near Gainesville is a great spot for tubing, and early starters have a chance at seeing North American river otters at play.
  8. Tampa Bay couples who latched locks on Paris bridges say their love will live on

    Human Interest

    They started unlocking the love in June, after the bridge collapsed and the locals complained and the city's leaders said no more.

    [Times files]
  9. Turn it all off and go outdoors

    Human Interest

    With a job title of digital audience manager, I get paid to be better than most at being digitally connected.

    Appreciating wildlife and the clear, cold, turquoise-tinted water of Manatee Spring.
  10. Famous people, famous places: Reflecting on the best parts of Florida

    Human Interest

    Ernest Hemingway once described Key West as "the best place I've ever been anytime anywhere, flowers, tamarind trees, guava trees, coconut palms. ... Got tight last night on absinthe and did knife tricks." That is a real, unedited quote. Although we might never know the result of that night of absinthe-induced …

    This photo by acclaimed Florida nature photographer Clyde Butcher is "Loxahatchee River State Park - 1991" will be included in the exhibit opening Jan. 8-29 at the Pasco-Hernando State art gallery. The exhibit Visions of Florida: The Photographic Art of Clyde Butcher is part of the Museum of Florida History's Traveling Exhibit (TREX) program. Butcher will will discuss his work in a special presentation, followed by a Q&A and book signing, on Wednesday, January 21, 2015 at 6 p.m. in the Performing Arts Center on the college's West Campus in New Port Richey.
  11. It never occurred to me that I was having a heart attack, but quick work saved me

    Health

    I was playing tennis one Friday morning last year when I felt a strange tightness in my upper chest. It was about 10:55 a.m., April 4.

  12. For breast cancer survivors, as the paint goes on, the pain comes off

    Human Interest

    TAMPA

    Karen Wardrop walks into a stranger's living room and takes off her clothes. Thick scars violate her chest and abdomen.

    Her psyche is just as maimed.

    Breast cancer survivor Karen Wardrop, 49, is photographed by artist Lisa Scholder in Scholder’s back yard after having her body painted for the Bodies of Courage art project. Below, Wardrop’s tattoo serves as a reminder of her fight with cancer.
  13. Love, etched in stone on Tampa's Riverwalk

    Human Interest

    TAMPA

    Love is patient, love is kind. Love is on a brick down by the Hillsborough River, which your correspondent noticed on a stroll a few months ago.

     Jennifer Rodriguez proposed to her boyfriend Roger Strawbridge with a brick in the Tampa Riverwalk section by Curtis Hixon Park last February.
  14. Letter from Japan: Living, and learning away from Florida

    Human Interest

    My most important lesson in Japan cost ¥190, and it came from a convenience store.

    Alex Orlando, a former Tampa Bay Times reporter, is now living — and learning — in Japan.
  15. Digital love: Couple goes from Tinder to #gio2016

    Human Interest

    One day in late November 2013, Nick Giovannucci was bored, playing on his iPhone. He was on Tinder, the dating app that matches your profile with eligible others based on shared interests and geography, then asks you to swipe right if you like what you see or left if you don't. If both parties swipe right, it's a …

    Kristina noticed Nick's Snapchat username was listed in his Instagram bio, so she addedhim with no intentions of actually sending him any photos.
  16. Tampa Bay sea grass beds expand, show water is now as clean as it was in 1950

    Water

    Tampa Bay now supports 40,295 acres of sea grass beds, the largest amount of sea grass measured since the 1950s, a new study by scientists at the Southwest Florida Water Management District has found.

    Then-Vice President Dan Quayle plants sea grass near the Gandy Bridge with Penny Hall of the Department of Natural Resources.
  17. Sea rise threatens Florida coast, but there's no statewide plan to deal with it

    Environment

    ST. AUGUSTINE — America's oldest city is slowly drowning.

    The Castillio de San Marcos fort, built over 450 years ago, is separated from the Matanzas River by a sea wall in St. Augustine. St. Augustine is one of many chronically flooded Florida communities afraid their buildings and economies will be inundated by rising seas in just a couple of decades. [Associated Press]
  18. A tale of two mothers: What one gave up to ease the ache of the other

    Human Interest

    LINDSAY

    When she got the call, Lindsay told herself not to get excited. So many things could still go wrong. Remember what happened last time?

    Denton August Lee, nicknamed Gus, gets tests in the hospital before he is allowed to leave with his new adoptive parents, Josh and Lindsay Lee.
[EVE EDELHEIT | Times]
  19. Maxwell: Florida needs new amendment to protect environment (w/video)

    Columns

    Enough is enough.

    In its familiar dissembling way, the Republican-led Florida Legislature is contravening the official will of the people.

    Florida needs a constitutional amendment guaranteeing a right to clean air, safe drinking water and a healthy environment.
  20. A story about Harry Reid that was, in fact, too juicy to be true

    Perspective

    A month ago, before reporters from Las Vegas to Washington knew him by his real name, Larry Pfeifer told a lie.

    He doesn't dispute it.

    He promotes it.

    Larry Pfeifer concocted a story to show how lies get airtime easily.