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Floridian Archives

  1. For women in the Pinellas County Jail, the Red Tent room offers tears, growth, hope

    Human Interest

    Editor's note: The four-hour Red Tent Project session was recorded. The women's words have been edited for length and clarity.

    LARGO

    Pinellas County Jail inmates Amanda Casler, left, and Yalira M. Perez have a light moment at a Red Tent Project meeting at the jail in December. Perez, 26, is in jail for forgery. “I’ve been rejected all my life, and I’m used to it,” she says. “I’m a loving, giving person. But I belittle myself, and I deserve that.”
  2. Greg Baker resurrects Florida Cracker cuisine at Fodder & Shine

    Food & Dining

    TAMPA

    Greg Baker stands in the Fodder & Shine kitchen explaining what will happen in a vast room full of gleaming ovens and prep counters when his phone rings for the fifth time. "And the haters gonna hate, hate, hate. Baby I'm just gonna shake, shake, shake. Shake it off." // Wife and business partner …

    Cornmeal, chicken fat fried chicken with sides of cornbread, and tomato gravy and rice at Fodder & Shine, in Tampa. Photographed on Friday January 9th, 2015.


MONICA HERNDON | TIMES
  3. In My Shoes: Stopping is not an option for Lois Huyghue

    Human Interest

    CLEARWATER

    Lois Huyghue, who hates cold like cats hate getting wet, pulled into Coachman Park to run a marathon. At 5 a.m., it was 36 degrees. Wearing two coats, three T-shirts and two hats, she peered out of her car window at a park full of skinny people in shorts and tank tops.

    None of them looked scared, …

    Lois Huyghue, 55, had a stroke when she was 18 months old and has limited control of her left arm and leg. She ran her first marathon last year in the Clearwater Distance Classic.
  4. Better watch Saul: Why Tampa Bay lawyers love devious attorney from 'Breaking Bad'

    The Feed

    Jot down every negative lawyer stereotype you can think of: greedy, arrogant, double-talking, backstabbing. Keep going, there's more.

    Bob Odenkirk plays ethically challenged lawyer Saul Goodman, who rose to fame in AMC’s Breaking Bad and is getting his own TV series, Better Call Saul, which debuts Feb. 8 on AMC. Better Call Saul begins six years before the start of Breaking Bad, when the lawyer didn’t work out of a strip mall, have drug-dealing clients and say things such as “You don’t want a criminal lawyer. You want a criminal lawyer.”
  1. Florida rancher's wish: a legacy of his land pristine forever

    Human Interest

    FORT PIERCE — Bud Adams, slim and dressed in blue jeans and a blue button-down shirt and cowboy boots and a cowboy hat, drove his Ford Explorer around his ranch in western St. Lucie County, looking at his land and his cattle. His truck, with manure caked in the tires, jounced in the ruts of rough paths. He's been …

    Bud Adams sits in his back yard at his ranch in Fort Pierce on a December day. He wears hearing aids. He has to have skin cancer spots removed from his face, the result of a life spent riding horses. He had a quadruple bypass a few years ago and gets short of breath. But he still works on his land. He loves his land. “I hate to leave it,” he says.
  2. Red-cockaded woodpeckers better off at forest in Hernando and across the country

    Human Interest

    BROOKSVILLE

    The fire-groomed forest — the tall, well-spaced longleaf pines, the floor of ferns and wire grass speckled with the last of the fall wildflowers — was proof that nature can thrive with a little help.

    The red-cockaded woodpecker, a federally endangered species, is a target of preservation efforts in the Withlacoochee State Forest near Brooksville.
  3. In this Blueberry Patch, free spirits thrive

    News

    GULFPORT

    The Blueberry Patch experiment began July 7, 1977 — 7/7/77 — in the back yard of a man named Dallas Bohrer, who had strong beliefs about numerology, economics, sake, marijuana, and freedom of music, art and the written word. He believed that being an artist and living free are the hardest …

    Nick Hildebrandt, 21, performs a triquetra trick with poi lights at the 12th annual Burning Blueberry Brother festival in Gulfport.
  1. In Pahokee, football serves as a way out

    Human Interest

    PAHOKEE — On the day he thought would change everything, Fred left home early while his siblings, nieces and nephews slept. He skipped breakfast, not even a Pop-Tart. His stomach was tight with excitement.

    The summer before his junior year at Pahokee High, Fred decided to focus on raising his grades, and to get away from friends who might be a bad influence. So he transferred to Everglades Prep charter school across town. He often stayed in class to work and ate a late lunch by himself.