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Hormel turns to social media to reach out to Spam fans

Brian Kroening, left, executive creative director of Hormel’s ad agency, BBDO Proximity, and Nicole Behne, Hormel senior product manager, hope digital ads will make you want Spam a lot.

BRUCE BISPING | Minneapolis Star Tribune

Brian Kroening, left, executive creative director of Hormel’s ad agency, BBDO Proximity, and Nicole Behne, Hormel senior product manager, hope digital ads will make you want Spam a lot.

After 75 years, Spam is going social. Big time.

Hormel's popular canned meat product is attempting to boost both brand loyalty and sales by marketing in social media with real-time messages through its mascot and spokesman, Sir Can-A-Lot.

A new season for Dancing With the Stars began? There was Sir Can-A-Lot the next day doing — what else? — the cancan.

March Madness is under way? There's Sir Can-A-Lot flying across the screen attempting to do a Michael Jordan-esque slow-motion slam dunk.

The Facebook and Twitter campaign, which also includes Pinterest, is part of Spam's March emphasis on social media under the theme of "Break the Monotony" of home-cooked meals by adding Spam, the largest-selling canned meat product in the United States.

"Spam is as American as apple pie. No one can steal that from us because of Spam's tradition," said Nicole Behne, Hormel's senior product manager for the Spam brand. "We need to continue to innovate."

The social media campaign is the work of Minneapolis-based BBDO Proximity, which has served as Hormel's only advertising agency for more than 80 years.

The Spam team meets daily, constantly surfs the Internet to see what topics are generating buzz on any particular day and then social media posts — usually less than 15 seconds in length — are developed. The voice of Sir Can-A-Lot comes from a professional voice-over actor in Los Angeles. The animation work is shipped to a specialty shop in Portland, Ore.

"It's almost like a newsroom," said BBDO executive creative director Brian Kroening of the immediacy of the campaign.

Behne said Hormel researched its Spam customers — both lovers and occasional users — before launching its first national digital advertising campaign.

"We found that those families are more digitally engaged. They're into crafting, they have hobbies, they love to cook," Behne said. "They're social, so we can go where they are."

Despite all the jokes made about Spam, it remains a very popular staple among U.S. consumers, with a growing international following. Spam is available in 44 countries.

In the United States, according to SymphonyIRI Group, a Chicago-based market research firm, Spam sales were up nearly 7 percent in the 12 months ending Feb. 24.

Behne said Spam's market share in the canned luncheon meat category is 87 percent, according to AC Nielsen data. She noted that online advertising can be less expensive than traditional print and broadcast advertising.

"Social media allows us to target our message to a narrower base of consumers that have a higher likelihood of buying this product, which makes it more cost effective," she said.

Kroening called the Spam community "a built-in nation of enthusiasts."

Hormel turns to social media to reach out to Spam fans 03/28/13 [Last modified: Thursday, March 28, 2013 8:43pm]

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