Florida’s nursing homes and assisted-living facilities find themselves in an unfamiliar place this week — pushing back against Gov. Rick Scott’s administration over new rules that require them to purchase generator capacity by Nov. 15 to keep their residents safe and comfortable in a power outage.

With 56 days remaining before the state imposes $1,000-a-day fees, full panic mode has set in on an industry that is more accustomed to dealing with the gentle touch of state regulators and industry-friendly legislators than it is with facing new rules.

The board of directors of LeadingAge, an industry association that represents 350 non-profit senior homes, on Monday voted to ask the governor’s office to delay the mandate as impractical.

Another group, the Florida Health Care Association, which represents 550 for-profit nursing homes, announced it was convening a “summit” on Friday to voice its concerns about the timing, the logistics and the cost of the new rule. And the national board of Florida Argentum, which represents assisted living and memory care facilities, said Tuesday it is hoping for more time to pay for the new rules in Florida — which it estimates carry price tags of $75,000 to $200,000 per home.

“Our members almost uniformly agree with the spirit of what the governor is trying to accomplish — the idea of keeping residents safe in an emergency — but our members have concerns about the practical implications of the rule,” said Steve Bahmer, president and CEO of LeadingAge Florida, which is also hosting the summit.

“So many contractors and engineers are involved with the recovery process statewide, it’s going to be very difficult to comply,” said Susan Anderson, vice president of policy for the ALF association,Florida Argentum.

It’s an about-face for most of the senior care industry and for the governor. Since Scott took office in 2011, he has significantly rolled back oversight of the powerful industry that represents more than 73,000 seniorsin 683 certified nursing homes, and tens of thousands of others in 3,109 assisted living facilities and memory care centers across the state. Story here.