Timothy Burke at Deadspin is asking why in the world Sen. Dana Young's Senate campaign is mailing out fliers on the abuse of greyhounds at race tracks.

With all that's challenging Florida and Tampa Bay  — sorry, too numerous to name here — THIS is what Young is targeting?

Here's Burke:

If you are not a Floridian, and by God's grace you may not be, you might be unfamiliar with the array of challenges facing our state. Our ridiculous homestead exemption, paired with the lack of a state income tax, leave state revenues at a level that renders Florida unable to properly fund basic operations. Despite this, or just out of force of habit, Republicans in the state legislature want to cut another $217 million from our higher education system. The medical marijuana law passed by 71% of voters has yet to actually be deployed. Rising sea levels are consuming our coastal communities while our governor has banned the discussion of "climate change." And a yokel Speaker of the House keeps stripping Florida's cities of the ability to govern themselves.

Naturally my state senator, who represents much of the city of Tampa, is making coke dogs her pet (heh, heh) issue. The trifold flyer I received urges immediate action due to "horrific, inhumane legislation" that is "being pushed."

Young won her Tampa Senate seat in 2016 in one of the closest senate races in Florida, a victory made possible by the third party-candidacy of strip club king Joe Render. The Democrat she beat, Bob Buesing, recently filed to run against her.

Sen. Dana Young.
Sen. Dana Young.

It's a purple district with more Democrats than Republicans, so Young will continue to portray herself as a moderate urban Republican. That'll take a big campaign account, and perhaps better ads that aren't so easily lampooned.

"Senator Young, instead of addressing Tampa's pathetic mass transit situation or our barely-funded schools, is bravely choosing/claiming to take on a coke dog problem that most experts say will be irrelevant given that greyhound racing is likely to be banned outright very shortly," Burke writes.