The Twitter reaction was swift and fierce to Thursday's ruling by U.S. District Judge Mark Walker that declared Florida's system of restoring felons' voting rights to be unconstitutional.

One of the more notable responses was from the former governor who had his measure making it easier for felons to restore their voting rights overturned by the current governor.

Democrats were quick to hail it, including those running for governor on the premise of rejecting much of Scott's legacy.

Of the main Democrats running to replace Scott, only Gwen Graham's Twitter was quiet on Walker's ruling.

But other Dems did weigh in.

Perhaps not surprising, Scott's Twitter was silent as well. Attorney General Pam Bondi, who initially pitched the idea of delaying the restoration of felons' rights, didn't mention it, nor the others who voted for it in 2011: GOP gubernatorial candidate Adam Putnam (though he did wish everyone a happy Groundhog Day) and former CFO Jeff Atwater.

Criticism was far outweighed by those lauding the decision. Most of the acclaim, much of it national, came from advocates like Bill Piper, senior director of national affairs for Drug Policy Alliance, a non-profit.

Former state senator Paula Dockery provider her usual hot take.

Some wondered if this would hurt the chances of a ballot measure that voters will decide on in November that would restore voting rights for most felons after they serve their sentences.

Also silent on Twitter was Desmond Meade, the man behind that ballot measure.