For weeks Andrew Pollack has taken his message to the White House, the state house and television screens across America: before we focus on gun control, we need to make our schools safer.

No policy changes are made in the wake of mass shootings, Pollack argues, because the national conversation immediately centers around gun control. The grieving father appeared on CBS Face the Nation Sunday to urge Americans to find common ground on the less divisive issue of school safety.

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"They're focusing on something that's not achievable. Gun laws right now are not achievable. My daughter was murdered by a gun. She should have been safe in the school. That's the problem," Pollack said. "That's the first thing I want to address."

Pollack's 18-year-old daughter, Meadow, was killed in the Feb. 14 Parkland school shooting.

The father's talk show appearance Sunday was just the latest in a series of public appeals for school safety. Pollack drew national attention for venting his frustration in a Feb. 22 White House listening session.

"I'm pissed. It was my daughter I am not going to see again. She is not here. She is not here," Pollack told the room filled with the families of shooting victims and President Donald Trump. "She is in North Lauderdale at whatever it is, King David Cemetery, that is where I go to see my kid now."

Since that listening session, Pollack has met with officials at the White House and appeared on numerous television programs. Last week on Fox News Sunday with Chris Wallace, Pollack gave an interview alongside Parkland survivor Delaney Tarr.

"This has to stop with Parkland, and my daughter's death can't be in vain," Pollack said then.

Pollack has said he supports reforms like adding metal detectors at school entrances. He says he wants to give schools the security of an airport or a courthouse. The father said Sunday he supports the gun reform package currently before the Florida Senate.

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Policy aside, Pollack has criticized the way the media covers mass shootings, arguing the press zeroes in on the most divisive issues instead of the ways Americans can find common ground.

"The American people, we just want our schools safe. We don't want to talk about guns right now," Pollack told Wallace Sunday, Feb. 25.

Update (Monday 10:00 a.m.): Sen. Marco Rubio endorsed Pollack's security-first agenda on Twitter Monday morning.