As federal and state investigators continue to examine two local jobs centers, the board of directors for each agency will again meet to decide the fate of the man who served as president and CEO of both: Edward Peachey.

Executive committees at CareerSource Pinellas and CareerSource Tampa Bay, which oversees Hillsborough County, both fired Peachey in recent weeks and agreed to pay him severance for five months.

TAMPA BAY TIMES COVERAGE: CAREERSOURCE

Within days of the firings, however, board members in both counties invoked a rule to void the decisions until the matter could be brought before the full boards. Peachey's lawyer has also threatened to sue the boards and their members.

After those moves, last week Gov. Rick Scott reiterated his call for both boards to change leadership amid the investigations.

"With multiple ongoing investigations currently being conducted … including potential criminal charges, it's unbelievable that the proper steps to protect taxpayers have still not been taken," the governor's communications director John Tupps told the Times.

Here's what you need to know about the problems at the bay area's local jobs centers:

Employment recruitment events are posted inside the lobby at the Science Center at CareerSource Pinellas Tyrone center in St. Petersburg. [DOUGLAS R. CLIFFORD | Times ]
Employment recruitment events are posted inside the lobby at the Science Center at CareerSource Pinellas Tyrone center in St. Petersburg. [DOUGLAS R. CLIFFORD | Times ]
1. How did this all start? 

The Times found that both agencies have taken credit for finding thousands of jobs for people who never registered for help. The Florida Department of Economic Opportunity launched an investigation into the agencies that has now been joined by the Florida Department of Law Enforcement and U.S. Department of Labor.

Edward Peachey, president and CEO of WorkNet Pinellas poses for a portrait at the headquarters in 2010. CHRIS ZUPPA, l Times
Edward Peachey, president and CEO of then-WorkNet Pinellas, poses for a portrait at the headquarters in 2010. [CHRIS ZUPPA  l  Times]
2. How long has Edward Peachey led the Hillsborough and Pinellas jobs centers? 

He took over CareerSource Pinellas in 2003. The certified accountant blossomed from a numbers cruncher into one of Tampa Bay's most influential industry leaders. He took over CareerSource Tampa Bay after a spending scandal in 2010 forced out the former leader. He has served as the leader of both agencies ever since, reporting to two different boards.

Edward Peachey, President and CEO, CareerSource Tampa Bay, talks to the media while his attorney Marion Hale looks on after an executive committee meeting at the CareerSource Tampa Bay office in Tampa to discuss his future with the agency on Feb. 2. [ALESSANDRA DA PRA | Times]
Edward Peachey, President and CEO, CareerSource Tampa Bay, talks to the media while his attorney Marion Hale looks on after an executive committee meeting at the CareerSource Tampa Bay office in Tampa to discuss his future with the agency on Feb. 2. [ALESSANDRA DA PRA | Times]
3. What is Edward Peachey’s job status at both agencies?

The fate of Peachey has been topic of much discussion by both boards in recent weeks. He has been on paid suspension in Pinellas County and placed on unpaid suspension in Hillsborough. But his attorney has threatened to file lawsuits against the members of both boards if they don't pay Peachey severance.

Gov. Rick Scott [SCOTT KEELER | Tampa Bay Times]Gov. Rick Scott [SCOTT KEELER | Times]

4. Gov. Rick Scott has called on the governing boards of CareerSource Tampa Bay and Pinellas to make leadership changes. But both boards are struggling over what to do with Peachey. When will those situations be resolved?

That could take while. The governor sent out his message to the boards after both rescinded their earlier votes to fire Peachey. The Hillsborough board called for an emergency meeting at 9 a.m. Thursday to discuss the Peachey situation. The situation in Pinellas will take longer to figure out. That board doesn't meet until March 21.

5. How many investigations are being conducted and how long will it take for them to finish? 

No government agency has said how long it will take for the state Department of Economic Opportunity, the Florida Department of Law Enforcement and the U.S. Department of Labor to investigate.  Pinellas-Pasco State Attorney Bernie McCabe's office is also monitoring the problems in his jurisdiction. CareerSource Tampa Bay board chair Dick Peck has told board members that all the various investigations could take up to two years to wrap-up.  But no state or federal official has released any kind of timetable.