It's only been one week since Ron DeSantis and Andrew Gillum won their parties' nomination for governor, but already race has become a prevalent issue — with only more news on the subject on Tuesday.

Via a statement from his campaign, DeSantis, a Republican, demanded that a member of the Orange County Republican Committee, Kathy Gibson, resign after she posted a racist meme on Facebook.

Gibson's post falsely accused Gillum of saying "his people" will get "paid back" for slavery if he is elected governor, according to Politico.

When Gillum, the mayor of Tallahassee, won the Democratic primary last week, he became the first African-American to have ever been nominated for governor by a major party in Florida.

Gibson also added her own commentary to the post, saying: "If anyone living in Florida at this time was a slave holder, had family that were slave holders or committed acts against African Americans please let Mayor Gillum know so he can bill you & your Family," according to Politico.

"This campaign is about issues and creating a better Florida for everyone," DeSantis said in the statement. "Kathy Gibson should resign, and so should anyone else that subscribes to this sort of disgusting thinking."

Gillum's campaign spokesman, Geoff Burgan, similarly said in a statement that voters should focus on what matters.

"This race should be about the issues. This shouldn't be about the mayor's skin color," Burgan wrote. "This race should be about red tide. This race should be about toxic blue-green algae. This race should be about citrus greening. And it should be about real green dollar bills that should be going into people's pockets."

But earlier on Tueday, DeSantis' campaign was criticized by state Rep. Jared Moskowitz, D-Coral Springs, for his response to a highly racist, anti-Gillum robocall that went out to people in Tallahassee, which was paid for by an Idaho-based neo-Nazi website and went out on Friday.

After the news broke about the call, DeSantis' campaign condemned it in a statement.

"This is absolutely appalling and disgusting—and hopefully whoever is behind this has to answer for this despicable action," wrote campaign spokesman Stephen Lawson on Friday. "Our campaign has and will continue to focus solely on the issues that Floridians care about and uniting our state as we continue to build on our success."

In a press release on Tuesday, Moskowitz said DeSantis should go farther and explicitly vow not to accept campaign help from hate groups.

"This is simple. Draft a press release, with your name attached to the quote instead of a spokesman that reads, 'I condemn these robocalls and I do not want, nor will I accept, the help of any Nazis,'" he said in the release. "If you are not capable of that, then I suggest listing an in-kind contribution from the Nazi Party on your next campaign finance report."

Additionally, Moskowitz alleged that DeSantis "opened the door" for neo-Nazis "with a remark in an interview on Fox News that made the station's own anchors uncomfortable."

He was referring to DeSantis' comment the day after the election that Florida shouldn't "monkey this up" by electing Gillum. DeSantis also called Gillum an "articulate spokesman" for the progressive movement.

Later that day, Fox News anchors read a statement on air that said they did "not condone" DeSantis' choice of words. His campaign said he was "obviously talking about Florida not making the wrong decision to embrace the socialist policies that Andrew Gillum espouses."

Moskowitz is a South Florida Democratic lawmaker who rose to prominence earlier this year after the Feb. 14 shooting in Parkland, which is in his district. Moskowitz was rumored to be in the running for Gillum's lieutenant governor pick, but he rejected the idea in a tweet, instead suggesting Gillum pick another Broward County lawmaker, Sen. Lauren Book.

The DeSantis campaign declined to comment on Moskowitz's criticism.