After loss, Republicans examine party's flaws

Top Republican officials, stunned by the extent of their election losses Tuesday night, have begun an exhaustive review to figure out what went so wrong and how to fix it.

Party leaders already had planned to poll voters in battleground states starting Tuesday night in anticipation of a Mitt Romney victory — to immediately begin laying the groundwork for midterm congressional elections and a Romney 2016 reelection bid.

But as they watched one state after another go to President Barack Obama and Senate seats fall away, party leaders quickly expanded and retooled their efforts. They're planning a series of voter-based polls and focus groups, meetings with constituency group leaders, and in-depth discussions with their volunteers, donors and staff members to find ways to broaden their appeal.

The review is a recognition that party leaders were confounded by the electorate that showed up on Tuesday. Republican officials said that they met all of their turnout goals but that they underestimated who would turn out for the other side.

Party officials said the review is aimed at studying their tactics and message, not at changing the philosophical underpinnings.

"This is no different than a patient going to see a doctor," said Sean Spicer, the Republican National Committee's spokesman. "Your number one thing is to say, 'I'm not feeling well. Tell me what the problem is. Run some tests on me.' "

Tuesday's results, along with national and state-level exit polls, illustrated the depth of the GOP's challenges and its growing weaknesses among crucial constituencies, such as Hispanics and women.

Although Democrats argue that Tuesday's results point to a potentially long-lasting winning coalition, Republicans are fighting among themselves about what went wrong.

Some party leaders have blamed the losses on the rise of the tea party movement and the growing pressure on GOP candidates to hew to a purist brand of conservatism that wins primaries but turns off voters. Others have taken the opposite view, blaming party establishment leaders and Romney for trying to play to the middle.

RNC officials say their results will help guide Republican lawmakers and governors as they tackle sensitive issues.

The committee's move suggests that chairman Reince Priebus, who will face re-election in January, may be trying to fill a power vacuum left by Romney's loss and the lack of a clear leader in the party.

Priebus and other party officials also will meet with constituency-group leaders representing Hispanics, African Americans, veterans, evangelicals, tea party activists, business groups, youth voters, centrists, Asian Americans and women.

Party officials plan to delve deeply into the Hispanic community, with separate focus group sessions being devoted to Puerto Ricans, a key bloc in central Florida that strongly backed Obama, as well as Mexican Americans and Cuban Americans. Mexican Americans make up the bulk of Hispanic voters in the battleground states of Colorado and Nevada.

The review comes amid signs that the election results have pushed some conservative leaders and officials to consider tackling one of the most politically touchy issues for many Republicans: whether to put millions of illegal immigrants on a path to citizenship. For years, conservatives have blocked immigration legislation. But seeing Obama win seven in 10 Hispanic voters appears to have left some wondering whether it is time to compromise, particularly with the president pledging to make the issue a centerpiece of his second-term agenda.

The Internet was buzzing late Thursday as word spread that Fox News Channel commentator Sean Hannity declared he had "evolved" on the issue and now thinks illegal immigrants without criminal records should have a "pathway to citizenship."

Obama set to tackle fiscal cliff

President Barack Obama will make his first post-election comments at 1 p.m. today about actions needed to avoid the so-called fiscal cliff that could plunge the economy back into recession. Obama is expected to urge Congress to act, including passing a bill that would prevent Bush-era tax cuts from expiring for all but the wealthiest Americans. In his address from the White House East Room, Obama is not expected to put forward a specific plan, but instead will call on lawmakers from both parties to work together to tackle the nation's fiscal problems. The newly re-elected president and Congress face a Jan. 1 deadline to avoid a combination of tax increases and spending cuts that all sides agree would undermine the military and other basic government functions.

Associated Press

After loss, Republicans examine party's flaws 11/08/12 [Last modified: Thursday, November 8, 2012 10:42pm]

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