Clear73° WeatherClear73° Weather

After tense vote, Boehner remains House speaker

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi of California, front row, center, poses with other female House members Thursday on the steps of the Capitol.

Associated Press

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi of California, front row, center, poses with other female House members Thursday on the steps of the Capitol.

WASHINGTON — Republican John Boehner narrowly won re-election Thursday as the speaker of the House of Representatives as the 113th Congress convened in an atmosphere of unusual uncertainty and turmoil.

Outwardly, the day had a festive air as children were allowed to sit in House members' seats and the usually somber halls of the Capitol complex teemed with revelers. Thursday also had an uplifting note, as Sen. Mark Kirk, R-Ill., who suffered a major stroke last year, climbed the 45 outdoor steps into the Senate chamber with the help of Vice President Joe Biden and two Senate colleagues.

There were celebrations of the diversity of the new Congress. The Senate welcomed its first openly gay member. Senate Republicans welcomed the first African-American Republican in three decades. The House Democratic caucus for the first time had a majority of members who weren't white men.

But there were undercurrents of internal divisions lingering from the fight over the fiscal cliff and signs of partisan battles to come in weeks ahead.

Boehner set that somber tone. "Public service was never meant to be an easy living. Extraordinary challenges demand extraordinary leadership," the Ohio Republican told the House.

"So if you have come here to see your name in lights or to pass off political victory as accomplishment, you have come to the wrong place. The door is behind you."

Even the election of the speaker, usually a routine matter, had moments of tension. Twelve Republicans didn't vote for Boehner, and his 220-vote total matched the lowest for a speaker in 14 years, when there were fewer Republicans.

The dissenters were conservatives who have complained that Boehner is too willing to deal with Democrats. They're still upset over the fiscal cliff deal, saying it didn't contain enough spending cuts; 151 Republicans voted against the plan, and it passed only because of a huge Democratic vote.

Boehner has tried to get tougher, as four Republicans were tossed off key committees, and he attempted earlier this week to get a majority for a massive spending-cut package. But the suspicions lingered, and Democrats signaled Thursday that they're going to dig in.

House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi of California was somewhat more partisan in her acceptance speech to the House. Her calls for more diversity and immigration restructuring drew standing ovations from Democrats, while most Republicans stayed in their seats, not applauding.

"The strength of our democracy will be advanced by bold action for comprehensive immigration reform," she said.

In the Senate, Republicans took the less conciliatory tone. Minority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., who helped craft the fiscal cliff deal, called it "imperfect," though he said it had settled Washington's long debate about raising revenue.

"The president got his revenue; now it's time to turn squarely to the real problem, which is spending," he said. "In a couple of months, the president will ask us to raise the nation's debt limit. We cannot agree to increase that borrowing limit without agreeing to reforms that lower the avalanche of spending that's creating this debt in the first place. It's not fair to the American people."

The Democratic leader urged calm. "The recent effort to avert the fiscal cliff was an example of both the divisions and the collaborations that will mark a moment in history — and it was a moment in history," said Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada.

Reid put off any first-day bickering by the new Senate class when he postponed action on revamping debate rules.

Among other things, the measure would require senators to speak on the floor to sustain extended debate and would cut the time after debate limits have been imposed from the current 30 hours to two hours.

The House adopted a measure that will, among other things, allow it to keep up its legal bid to defend the Defense of Marriage Act, which defines marriage as between a man and a woman.

The Obama administration said two years ago that it would no longer defend the Defense of Marriage Act, but a House Republican group is doing so.

113th Congress | by the numbers

BY PARTY

The House has 233 Republicans and 200 Democrats. Each party should pick up one more seat when two vacancies are filled. Senate Democrats will have a caucus of 55, including two independents. Republicans have 45. Democrats gained two seats.

woMEN

The House will have 79 women, including 60 Democrats. At the end of the last session, there were 50 Democratic women and 24 Republican women. The new Senate will have 20 women members, an increase of three. That consists of 16 Democrats and four Republicans. The last Senate had 12 Democratic women and five Republicans.

AFRICAN-AMERICANS

The House will have 40 African-Americans, all Democrats. The number of Democrats is unchanged.

hispanics

The new House will have 33 Hispanics, with 25 Democrats and eight Republicans. That's up slightly from last year. The Senate will have three Hispanics, including Republican Marco Rubio of Florida.

of note

According to CQ Roll Call, the House will include some 277 Protestants and Catholics, 22 Jews, two Muslims and two Buddhists. The Senate will have 80 Protestants and Catholics and 10 Jews. The House will have its first Hindu, Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, D-Hawaii. Senate freshman Mazie Hirono, also of Hawaii, will be the Senate's only Buddhist. For the first time, white men will be a minority among House Democrats.

After tense vote, Boehner remains House speaker 01/03/13 [Last modified: Thursday, January 3, 2013 11:54pm]

Copyright: For copyright information, please check with the distributor of this item, McClatchyTribune.
    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...