Agreements put 193 nations on track to deal with climate change

CANCUN, Mexico — Delegates from 193 nations agreed Saturday on a new global framework to help developing countries curb their carbon output and cope with the effects of climate change, but they postponed the harder question of how industrialized and major emerging economies will share the task of making deeper greenhouse-gas emission cuts in the coming decade.

The package known as the Cancun Agreements has salvaged a U.N.-backed process that was close to failure, delivering a diplomatic victory to the talks' Mexican hosts. But it also highlighted the obstacles that await as countries continue to grapple with climate change through broad international negotiations.

After an all-night session that included a face-off between Mexican Foreign Secretary Patricia Espinosa and Bolivia's U.N. Ambassador Pablo Solon, members of the U.N. Framework Convention on Climate Change agreed to create a "Green Climate Fund" that will transfer money from rich countries to poor ones; research centers that will ease the transfer of clean-energy technology; and a system in which developing nations can be compensated for keeping rain forests intact.

But the outcome left some gaping holes, including spelling out exactly how the new pot of international aid will be funded and whether the 1997 Kyoto Protocol, the current global climate pact, will be extended once its first commitment period expires in 2012.

Agreements put 193 nations on track to deal with climate change 12/11/10 [Last modified: Monday, November 7, 2011 1:40pm]

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