Clear67° FULL FORECASTClear67° FULL FORECAST
Make us your home page
Instagram

Alabama church marks 50th anniversary of bombing

The Rev. Julius Scruggs, third from left, leads a prayer Sunday during a wreath-laying ceremony at 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham.

Associated Press

The Rev. Julius Scruggs, third from left, leads a prayer Sunday during a wreath-laying ceremony at 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham.

BIRMINGHAM, Ala. — Hundreds of people black and white, many holding hands, filled an Alabama church that was bombed by the Ku Klux Klan 50 years ago Sunday to mark the anniversary of the blast that killed four little girls and became a landmark moment in the civil rights struggle.

The Rev. Arthur Price taught the same Sunday school lesson that members of 16th Street Baptist Church heard the morning of the bombing — "A Love That Forgives." Then, the rusty old church bell was tolled four times as the girls' names were read.

Bombing survivor Sarah Collins Rudolph, who lost her right eye and sister Addie Mae Collins in the blast, stood by as members laid a wreath at the spot where the dynamite device was placed along an outside wall.

Rudolph was 12 at the time, and her family left the church after the bombing. She said it was important to return in memory of her sister, who was 14, and the three other girls who died: Carole Robertson and Cynthia Wesley Morris, both 14, and Denise McNair, 11.

"God spared me to live and tell just what happened on that day," said Rudolph, who testified against the klan members convicted years later in the bombing.

Congregation members and visitors sang the old hymn Love Lifted Me and joined hands in prayer. The somber Sunday school lesson was followed by a raucous, packed worship service with gospel music and believers waving their hands.

During the sermon, the Rev. Julius Scruggs of Huntsville, president of the National Baptist Convention USA, said, "God said you may murder four little girls, but you won't murder the dream of justice and liberty for all."

Later Sunday, Attorney General Eric Holder and others were set to attend a commemoration. Former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, a Birmingham native who went to school with McNair, was among the scheduled speakers.

The dynamite bomb went off outside the church Sept. 15, 1963. Of the klan members convicted years later, one remains imprisoned. Two others died in prison. Birmingham was strictly segregated at the time of the bombing, which occurred as city schools were being racially integrated for the first time. The all-black 16th Street Baptist Church was a gathering spot for civil rights demonstrations for months before the blast.

The bombing became a powerful symbol of the depth of racial hatred in the South and helped build momentum for later laws, including the 1964 Civil Rights Act and the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Alabama church marks 50th anniversary of bombing 09/15/13 [Last modified: Sunday, September 15, 2013 10:15pm]
Photo reprints | Article reprints

Copyright: For copyright information, please check with the distributor of this item, Associated Press.
    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...