Tuesday, April 24, 2018

As protests and politics boil, four slain Americans are remembered

Their deaths, far from home, had become a flash point of politics in Washington, grist in the ongoing election-year debate about President Barack Obama's leadership at a time of uncertainty abroad.

Yet on Friday afternoon, the bodies of the four Americans who perished in Libya arrived back on U.S. soil, and for a moment these men could be remembered for who they were in life, not what they had become in death.

Their coffins, each draped in an American flag, arrived at Andrews Air Force Base aboard a gray military aircraft and were each carried down the ramp by seven Marines in dress uniforms. Ambassador J. Christopher Stevens and three State Department employees — Sean Smith, an information management officer, and security personnel Glen Doherty and Tyrone Woods — were killed Tuesday when militants overran the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi.

Now, the men, as Obama would say during the formal Transfer of Remains ceremony, had come home. The coffins were placed in front of four black hearses inside a vast hangar, a giant flag hanging from the rafters. After a benediction was read, Obama and Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, dressed in dark colors, took turns putting a face on the fallen before dozens of family, friends and State Department employees.

"Four Americans, four patriots," said Obama, who had met privately with family members. "They had a mission, and they believed in it. They knew the danger, and they accepted it. They didn't simply embrace the American ideal, they lived it, they embodied it: the courage, the hope and, yes, the idealism. That fundamental American belief that we can leave this world a little better than before."

Welcoming home the remains of the dead is a grim duty for a president. And it is one that Obama has done several times for troops from Afghanistan. But it was never like this — in the middle of an election, in a fight for his political life.

Here they were: There was Smith, the technology wizard who Clinton said was mourned as widely by "gamers" online as he was in the halls of federal Washington. There was Doherty, known as "Bub," and Woods, known as "Rone," both former Navy SEALs who did tours in Iraq and Afghanistan before protecting America's diplomats.

And there was Stevens, 52, who had worked closely with the Libyan people during their overthrow of strongman Moammar Gadhafi last year, then stayed on to help the new government rebuild. He became the first U.S. ambassador killed in the line of duty since 1979, but Clinton wanted her listeners to remember a man who was beloved not just by his co-workers but by the citizens of the foreign countries in which he served.

She told the audience that she had received a letter this week from the president of the Palestinian Authority, who had worked closely with Stevens in Jerusalem and remembered his "energy and integrity."

"What a wonderful gift you gave us," Clinton said, addressing Stevens' family.

The mood was solemn and dignified. A Marine band played The Star-Spangled Banner, and Obama put his arm around Clinton briefly as they returned to their seats next to Vice President Joe Biden and other dignitaries. The coffins were moved into the hearses as the band played America the Beautiful.

It was a scene far removed from the chaos and violence of the streets in Benghazi and the noisy, discourteous debate on the presidential campaign trail.

In the wake of the deaths, Republican nominee Mitt Romney blasted Obama's foreign policy and what Romney said was the administration's eagerness, before denouncing the attack on Americans, to apologize for an anti-Muslim film that was blamed for sparking anger across the Mideast. Obama and his allies, along with some GOP leaders, quickly condemned Romney for politicizing the tragedy and inaccurately characterizing the White House's response.

On Friday, Romney, campaigning in Painesville, Ohio, paused to lead a moment of silence and delayed his stump speech until the ceremony at Andrews had concluded. He instructed his supporters to place their hands over their hearts "in recognition of the blood shed for freedom."

Even amid the show of respect, however, politics loomed.

But on Friday, Obama and Clinton used the memories of Stevens and his colleagues to reaffirm America's commitment to lead, even in troubled times.

Obama recalled the image of a man in Benghazi holding a sign that read in English: "Chris Stevens was a friend to all Libyans."

"That's the message these four patriots sent," Obama said. "That even as the voices of suspicion and mistrust seek to divide countries and cultures from one another, the United States of America will never retreat from the world."

The Marines closed the rear doors of the hearses and saluted as the vehicles rolled out of the hangar to a plane that would carry the remains to another military base in Dover, Del.

The journey for the four men was almost over. The debate over their deaths has only begun.

 
Comments
A Sarasota girl nearly dies after accidentally ingesting pool water

A Sarasota girl nearly dies after accidentally ingesting pool water

It started off like a regular pool day at her grandparent’s home. Elianna Grace, 4, and other kids were having fun, blowing water out of pool noodles at each other.Then, as Elianna was blowing water out one end of the noodle, someone else accidentall...
Updated: 8 minutes ago
‘Schoolhouse Rock’ songwriter Bob Dorough dies

‘Schoolhouse Rock’ songwriter Bob Dorough dies

"I'm just a bill." "Conjunction junction, what's your function?" "Three is a magic number."If you instantly start singing along, you're of that 'Schoolhouse Rock' generation that learned lifelong lessons about civics, grammar, math and other school s...
Updated: 21 minutes ago
The ‘most interesting man in the world’ will be tending bar in Tampa on Friday

The ‘most interesting man in the world’ will be tending bar in Tampa on Friday

"Stay thirsty, my friends," the most interesting man in the world is coming to Tampa to tend bar on Friday. Jonathan Goldsmith, the face that launched a thousand memes, will be slinging cocktails at Tampa’s trendy Hall on Franklin, the food hall anno...
Updated: 1 hour ago
Solid waste director gets job back

Solid waste director gets job back

NEW PORT RICHEY — Pasco County is rehiring its former solid waste director who blew the whistle on a behind-the-scenes effort to buy a privately owned landfill in Sumter County. John Power, who worked previously for the county for 19 years, is schedu...
Updated: 1 hour ago
Sarasota student under fire over his racist ‘promposal’

Sarasota student under fire over his racist ‘promposal’

The Sarasota County School District has begun to address the community after a Riverview High School student’s racist prom proposal over the weekend went viral, including reaching out to the Sarasota chapter of the NAACP.High school senior Noah Crowl...
Updated: 1 hour ago
Democratic candidates react to Patrick Murphy trial balloon

Democratic candidates react to Patrick Murphy trial balloon

Democratic gubernatorial candidates react to the possibility Patrick Murphy could enter the race and run with Republican David Jolly.Andrew Gillum campaign:"We welcome anyone who wants to talk about Florida's future. The contrast in vision and backgr...
Updated: 1 hour ago
The Latest: Trump says VA nominee to make decision soon

The Latest: Trump says VA nominee to make decision soon

President Donald Trump says his nominee to lead Veterans Affairs, Dr. Ronny Jackson, will soon be "making a decision" about his future amid questions about the White House doctor and Navy rear admiral.
Updated: 1 hour ago
Blue Jackets good again, just not good enough for next level

Blue Jackets good again, just not good enough for next level

The Columbus Blue Jackets were good again, just not good enough to win a playoff series
Updated: 1 hour ago
A look at how Marvel Studios built a box-office juggernaut

A look at how Marvel Studios built a box-office juggernaut

How every Marvel Studios film of the last 10 years has fared at the box office
Updated: 1 hour ago

MPAA head says theaters will survive rise of streaming sites

New MPAA chief, theater owners group head optimistic about movie business
Updated: 1 hour ago