Scattered Clouds68° WeatherScattered Clouds68° Weather

Astronauts grab Hubble Space Telescope

A NASA TV image shows Hubble in the grips of shuttle Atlantis’ robotic arm Wednesday. Onlookers were happy the telescope “still looks in fantastic shape.”

Associated Press

A NASA TV image shows Hubble in the grips of shuttle Atlantis’ robotic arm Wednesday. Onlookers were happy the telescope “still looks in fantastic shape.”

CAPE CANAVERAL — Atlantis' astronauts grabbed the Hubble Space Telescope Wednesday, then quickly set their sights on the dangerous and unprecedented spacewalking repairs they will attempt over the next five days.

Hubble and Atlantis are flying in a 350-mile-high orbit littered with space junk. The shuttle already has an ugly stretch of nicks from Monday's launch, but the damage is considered minor and poses no safety threat. NASA continued to prep another shuttle just in case Atlantis is hit by orbital debris and the crew needs to be rescued.

Hubble looked surprisingly well. Flight controllers gasped when the telescope first came into view.

"It's an unbelievably beautiful sight," reported John Grunsfeld, the telescope's chief repairman. "Amazingly, the exterior of Hubble, an old man of 19 years in space, still looks in fantastic shape."

NASA hopes to get another five to 10 years of dazzling views of the cosmos from Hubble, with all the planned upgrades, which should leave the observatory more powerful than ever.

Shuttle robot arm operator Megan McArthur used the 50-foot boom to seize the school bus-sized telescope as the two spacecraft sailed 350 miles above Australia. Then she lowered the observatory into Atlantis' payload bay, where cameras checked it out.

Hubble scientists and managers warned that Hubble might look a little ragged because it hasn't had a tuneup since 2002. But initial observations showed nothing major.

"Everybody's very excited up here, I can tell you," said Grunsfeld, who will venture out Thursday with Andrew Feustel. They will replace an old Hubble camera the size of a baby grand piano, as well as a science data-handling unit that failed in September.

"Don't hold us to too high a standard," NASA space operations chief Ed Weiler warned before Monday's launch. "We're trying to do two things that we've never done before, take apart instruments that aren't designed to be taken apart in space and operated on by gloved astronauts, and fix them after pulling out 110 or 111 screws.

"That's one heck of a challenge."

Two teams of astronauts will take turns stepping outside. Besides swapping out the old camera and science data unit, they will replace Hubble's batteries, gyroscopes and a pointing mechanism. They will install fresh thermal covers on the telescope, along with a docking ring so a future spacecraft can guide the telescope into the Pacific Ocean sometime in the early 2020s. They also will open two broken science instruments to replace fried electronics.

No one will visit Hubble after the Atlantis astronauts leave next week, so NASA crammed as much as it could into the five spacewalks and poured more than $1 billion into the mission. Managers chose two spacewalkers who have been to Hubble before, Michael Massimino and Grunsfeld, who is making a record third visit.

Shuttle Endeavour will remain on standby until Atlantis and its crew of seven head back to Earth at the end of next week.

Astronauts grab Hubble Space Telescope 05/13/09 [Last modified: Wednesday, May 13, 2009 10:58pm]

© 2014 Tampa Bay Times

    

Join the discussion: Click to view comments, add yours

Loading...