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Britain belittled leader of Pakistan in cables

LONDON — Leaked U.S. diplomatic cables reveal that British officials initially considered Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari a "numbskull" who would not last long in office.

In cables from 2008 released Saturday by the WikiLeaks website, British government officials offered a pessimistic assessment of Pakistan's prospects as it battled financial turmoil and Taliban and al-Qaida violence.

Zardari is the widower of former Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto, who was assassinated in late 2007. He took over her political party and was elected president by lawmakers in September 2008.

In a cable the same month, a diplomat at the U.S. Embassy in London said the British government "makes no attempt to hide from us its disdain for Zardari." The memo says British officials saw Zardari as "highly corrupt and lacking popular support, simply having benefited from his wife's unfortunate demise." They predicted he would be out of office within a year.

In a meeting the next month recounted in a separate cable, the then-head of the British military, Air Chief Marshal Sir Jock Stirrup, told U.S. officials that although Zardari has "made helpful political noises, he's clearly a numbskull."

But the next month a Foreign Office official, Laura Hickey, was quoted as saying Zardari had done "surprisingly well" and the British had underestimated him.

Militants kill four alleged spies

Militants on Saturday killed four men accused of spying in northwest Pakistan, police said. Police official Mohsin Shah said the slain men were found in a village outside Karak district near the North Waziristan tribal region. A note near the bodies accused them of being Indian and Israeli agents, he said.

Britain belittled leader of Pakistan in cables 02/05/11 [Last modified: Saturday, February 5, 2011 9:29pm]
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