Cancer survivors urged to eat better, exercise

Cancer survivor Susan Morris, 65, of Decatur, Ga., stays active, and research shows that may help keep the disease from returning.

Associated Press

Cancer survivor Susan Morris, 65, of Decatur, Ga., stays active, and research shows that may help keep the disease from returning.

ATLANTA — A cancer diagnosis often inspires people to exercise and eat healthier. Now the experts say there's strong evidence that both habits may help prevent the disease from coming back.

New guidelines issued Thursday by the American Cancer Society urge doctors to talk to their cancer patients about eating right, exercising and slimming down if they're too heavy.

That's not something most doctors do, said Dr. Omer Kucuk, an Emory University oncologist who has researched the effect of nutrition on prostate cancer. They're focused on surgery, chemotherapy or other treatments for their patients, he added.

"Usually the last thing on their mind is to talk about diet and exercise," Kucuk said.

Cancer society officials have long encouraged healthy eating and exercise as a way to prevent certain cancers. They and others have tried to spread that gospel to cancer survivors as well.

But until now, the group didn't think there was enough research to support a strong statement for cancer survivors.

Being overweight or obese has long been tied to an increased risk of several types of cancer, including cancers of the colon, esophagus, kidney, pancreas and, in postmenopausal women, breast. But there hadn't been much evidence on the effects of diet and exercise for people who had had cancer.

The last five years saw more than 100 studies involving cancer survivors, many of them showing that exercise and/or a healthy diet was associated with lower cancer recurrence rates and longer survival.

Most of the research was on breast, prostate and colorectal cancer. Most of the work involved observational studies, which can't prove a cause and effect. Still, the volume of research was compelling.

"We've got enough data now to make these recommendations," said Colleen Doyle, the organization's director of nutrition and physical activity.

At least two other medical groups have strongly recommended exercise and healthier eating for cancer survivors, but the cancer society's new guidelines are expected to have much greater impact.

Cancer survivors urged to eat better, exercise 04/26/12 [Last modified: Thursday, April 26, 2012 10:22pm]

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