Egypt judges say most will boycott referendum

Egyptian Army tanks, left, deploy outside the presidential palace as Egyptian protesters gather in Cairo on Tuesday.

Associated Press

Egyptian Army tanks, left, deploy outside the presidential palace as Egyptian protesters gather in Cairo on Tuesday.

CAIRO — Most Egyptian judges rejected any role Tuesday in overseeing the country's constitutional referendum, a move likely to cast further doubt on the legitimacy of the disputed charter.

The nation's worst crisis since Hosni Mubarak's ouster nearly two years ago also forced the government to put off a crucial deal with the International Monetary Fund for a $4.8 billion loan, shattering any hope for recovery of the country's ailing economy anytime soon.

On one side of the divide is President Mohammed Morsi, his Muslim Brotherhood and their ultra-conservative Islamist allies, against an opposition camp of liberals, leftists and Christians who contend the draft charter restricts freedoms and gives Islamists vast influence over the running of the country.

An unexpected twist came when the defense minister, a Morsi appointee, invited the opposition, along with judges, media leaders and Muslim and Christian clerics to an informal gathering today, saying he was doing so in his personal — not an official — capacity.

It was the second time this week that the nation's powerful military has addressed the crisis, signaling its return to the political fray after handing over power in June to Morsi, Egypt's first civilian president.

The military sees itself as the guarantor of Egypt's interests and secular traditions. Earlier this week, it warned of disastrous consequences if the crisis over the country's draft constitution is not resolved.

"We will only sit together … For the sake of every Egyptian, come and disagree. But we won't be cross with one another or clash," Defense Minister Abdel-Fatah el-Sissi said on state television.

"We are not concerned with politics. We want to reassure the people that we can sit together," added Maj. Gen. Mohammed el-Assar, el-Sissi's deputy, speaking on a private TV network.

The opposition said it would not participate in any meeting that was nothing more than an informal gathering. The Brotherhood said it would attend.

Egypt judges say most will boycott referendum 12/11/12 [Last modified: Tuesday, December 11, 2012 10:34pm]

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