Egypt's final round of parliamentary voting expected to seal Islamists' dominance

An Egyptian woman casts her vote Tuesday as another checks for her name at a polling center in Qalyobeia, Egypt, during the third and final round of elections for the country’s new Parliament.

Associated Press

An Egyptian woman casts her vote Tuesday as another checks for her name at a polling center in Qalyobeia, Egypt, during the third and final round of elections for the country’s new Parliament.

CAIRO — Egyptians voted Tuesday in the final round of elections likely to seal the domination by Islamists over the country's new Parliament as secular activists grew increasingly worried over the possibility of an alliance between the powerful Muslim Brotherhood and the ruling military.

Activists point to what they call mounting signs of a confluence of interests between the Brotherhood, who are set to be the biggest bloc in the next parliament, and the ruling generals. The result, they fear, will be a shelving of reforms for greater democracy that they hoped for after the Feb. 11 fall of President Hosni Mubarak.

"Some very turbulent months are ahead of us," said rights lawyer and activist Negad Borai.

"The military wants a safe return to its past life away from the limelight and with its privileges and prestige, and the Islamists want power. The two have a deal that's at everyone else's expense," Borai said.

The multistage elections for the 498-seat Parliament, the first to be held since Mubarak's ouster, have been the fairest and freest in living memory, a sharp contrast to the large-scale rigging and fraud that defined almost every election since army officers seized power in a 1952 coup.

The fundamentalist Muslim Brotherhood, the nation's largest and best-organized political group, and the ultraconservative Islamic Salafis have dominated the first two rounds of the vote held since November, together gaining about 70 percent of the vote. That trend is expected to continue in the third and final round, which began Tuesday.

Their triumph has come at the expense of liberal and left-leaning parties and youth groups behind Mubarak's ouster who have since been calling for the military to immediately step down.

The Brotherhood has denied having any deal with the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces, the group of generals that took power after Mubarak's ouster.

Prosecutor calls Mubarak a tyrant

The chief prosecutor delivered the harshest assessment of Hosni Mubarak's rule ever heard in an Egyptian courtroom Tuesday, accusing the ousted leader of tyranny and corruption. The speech by Mustafa Suleiman seemed aimed at energizing the landmark trial of Mubarak, his two sons and eight other defendants, which resumed this week after five months of sessions that often were bogged down by lengthy delays, muddled testimonies and procedural issues. Mubarak, his former chief of security and other top police figures are charged with complicity in the killing of more than 800 protesters in the crackdown on the popular uprising against his rule. He and his sons, Alaa and one-time heir apparent Gamal, face corruption charges in the same trial.

Egypt's final round of parliamentary voting expected to seal Islamists' dominance 01/03/12 [Last modified: Tuesday, January 3, 2012 10:32pm]

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